Please advise me on a good quality toolset.

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Hi all

I am an amateur DIYer and I thought it was high time I bought a really decent toolkit rather than managing with the random disorganised jumble of mainly pretty cheap tools that I currently just about manage with.

I was prepared to spend a few hundred on something really good - something to be proud of that would last a long time and that you can really rely on, but my Dad found this apparent bargain...

http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id=23643

Could I get your opinion on whether the tools are likely to be of a high quality and will last a good few years without wearing, rounding, slipping, etc?

I would also welcome any other recommendations. I realise that you get what you pay for and would be very interested to hear what you consider to be the best toolkits on the market. Here are some deals I have been looking at on eBay. Please let me know what you think. Presumably these would be a lot better than the Screwfix set given the price. I would rather spend more on a really good set that will last.

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=150118515306

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=150121273308

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=250115048561

This seems exceptionally good with the free tools: -

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=200108306584

Many thanks for reading my post and for any advice you can offer.

Kind regards

Jon
 
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Hi John

Thanks so much for a really quick reply!

Really I just wanted a general set that will cover me for most typical home and car DIY jobs. So I want it to include a good range of tools: - set of screwdivers, spanners, pliers, etc.

For example, the current job I am doing is converting a bare garage to a utility room, which includes sealing and painting walls and floors, assembling heavy duty shelving, wiring additional electrical sockets, plumbing in a sink/washing machine, etc. Next will be a facelift to the bathroom - tiling, adding a shower, etc.

Many thanks

Jon
 
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The work you mention does not require a socket set or a large set of spanners.

A large steel tool cabinet is suitable for garage work where you bring the job (car) to the tools. It is not suitable for carrying about.

The sets you mention contain lots of tools for mending cars. Most of them you willnever use. Some are poor quality.

You can get a good set of Chrome-Vanadium screwdrivers quite cheaply at your local DIY shed as it is a high-volume item. Get a wallholder to hang them in.

Get a set of about 4 adjustable spanners (forged, chrome-vanadium if you can afford it). The smallest shoulbe be no more that 4 inches long.

And a pliers set with insulated handles with finger-guards (as before)

You will also need a large SD-plusdrillwith rotate-stop, and a small, kight, rechagable drill for small jobs and for holding above your head.

You will need a cheapmultimeter.

I would advise several plastic toolboxes, not steel ones. they are lighter and do not hurt your leg so much. You only need to cary the one with the sort of tools you need that day.

You will also need a few hammers.

Stand by for more advice...
 
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p.s.if you will be doing the bathroom,I believe most plumbers carry a chainsaw for notching the joists :LOL:
 
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ch427 said:
halfords do some pro quality socket sets with ratchet spanners included that are excellent and are good value

I would have to agree with ch427, I have had my halfords pro socket set for about 10 years now, can't fault it . Make sure you get the pro set though.
 
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...and guess what? That socket set is £50 off at the moment on the Halfords website! Good timing!

...right, now to find that chainsaw!
 
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From experience, I'd say proportion the larger part of your budget for the tools you'd use most often (cordless drill, SDS, adjustable spanners, socket set) and a lesser part on those you'll use less. If you're only going to use, say, a plastering float once, don't spend silly money on one (try and avoid tat, tho!).

I find that if you buy what you need, when you need it; you tend to avoid buying things you'll never use.


Also, beware of 'shiny thing' syndrome. Got cash to burn in the tool shop; buy useless shiny things because they'll look good on your shelf!! :LOL:

Guilty :oops:
 
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I agree with..wanabechippie...Buy good quality tools, as you need them.
If you buy a large set, no matter the quality, you will not use half of them.
 
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basically treat even the highest quality items as expendable/consumables and have loads of redundancy, best to get 3 of each of the essentials rather than one of everything.
...and never lend anything out :)

b.
 
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bananaspark said:
basically treat even the highest quality items as expendable/consumables and have loads of redundancy, best to get 3 of each of the essentials rather than one of everything.
...and never lend anything out :)

b.

Absolutely right! I have two cordless drills, three tape measures, two stanley knives, two sets of screwdrivers etc..
I have found that over the years I'll find a job to do, find out how to do it and buy the correct tools to do the job. Eventually, you get everything that you need.
 

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