Radiator not getting very hot

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Hello I am doing my house up and I have had to remove all the central heating pipes and I need to put them all back in again but as time is ticking by I need to put a little bit of heat back into the kitchen room as no kitchen is fitted as yet, so I put a radiator on the wall and connected it all up great tested it over night for any leaks and nothing so tonight I turned on the boiler the 22mm flow pipes heat up hot but the radiator didn’t I created a 22mm return link within the pipes to allow for hot water to flow out of the boiler to save damage
I am thinking that the hot water is going round the 22mm pipe faster than the 15m. Copper pipe to the radiator and I’m guessing there isn’t enough pressure to force hot water down to the radiator for it to warm up?
Please see the photo of the only pipes I have connected the connection is only temporary until I get more time to install all the copper pipe to the other 5 radiators should I put a reduction tap in to allow more hot water pressure to build up thus forcing it to the radiator
 

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It looks as if you have bypassed the radiator completely, so the water is taking the easiest route - along the 22mm.
 
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That was my thinking too I will fit a reducer in there temporarily until I get time to finish the rest of the pipe work shouldn’t take too long just got 2 more stud walls to build the get them plastered and I’m good to connect up
Thank you for your quick reply
 
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Hi,

I'm sorry if I sound negative and I know the connections are temporary, but I think the soldering in the photo may cause you future issues.

It looks as though the joints haven't been cleaned up after the soldering. Excess flux can cause corrosion and pitting of the copper, this could lead to pinhole leaks in the pipes.

Have you been using solder wire in addition to the solder within the fittings rings?
If you haven't used additional wire, there appears to be too much solder on the exterior of the connectors.
You may have heated the joints for too long (judging by the colour of the copper); most of the solder that would have sealed the joint may have flowed out. Again this could lead to leaks.

Apart from that, the laying out of the return loop looks beautiful! :)
 
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Thanks for your reply yes I was adding more solder just practicing but after joining pipes with out extra solder the connections were cleaner I’m not sure how to clean the flux off the pipes apart from a cloth?
Yes I did have the heat too high I have turned down the pressure too
 
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Thanks for your reply yes I was adding more solder just practicing but after joining pipes with out extra solder the connections were cleaner I’m not sure how to clean the flux off the pipes apart from a cloth?
Yes I did have the heat too high I have turned down the pressure too

Please forgive me, as I don't know your experience, or the tools you have, but this is the way I usually go about soldering!

It is very difficult to solder dirty copper. The cleaner it is, the better and the easier it is to solder.

When a pipe end is cut (and de-burred), it should be cleaned up to a bright copper colour. You can use wire wool, but I prefer Scotch Brite pads (wire wool fragments left in the pipes could get caught up in the C/H system and corrode!):

https://www.cromwell.co.uk/shop/abrasives/hand-finishing-abrasives/7447+-scotch-brite™-hand-pad-158-x-224mm/p/SCH2457002E

The inside of any connectors should also be cleaned up and polished, with any nibs of solder removed.

Coat the inside of the connector and the outside of the pipe with some flux.
Then solder!

When heating the connector, the solder will flow out from the ring (assisted by the flux). You only have to heat the connection long enough to see a slight glisten from the solder, creeping out of the edge of the connector.
This should be enough to seal the connection, without the need for solder wire.
You can add some if you wish, but clean the joint again and add some more flux first.

To clean the joint afterwards, polish again with the Scotch Brite.

If you need to cool a joint down, have a damp cloth to hand; pooring water on a new joint could cause steam that bubbles through the solder causing leaks.

Protect surfaces with a solder mat!

If you want to, have a practice with some off cuts and a bag of fittings. Have a go at soldering onto a polished bit of copper and a tarnished bit, you'll soon see the difference and get a feel for how long you need to heat a joint for.

I hope that makes sense and I haven't sounded patronising! If you are unsure of anything I have said, let us know.
Have fun! :)
 
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Did you really intend to create a one pipe loop? If you intended 2 pipe you don't need to make a loop just cap end 22mm after rad tee's ( or put valves on)
 
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I have made a slight temporary alteration and fitted a valve and now the radiator is getting hot as it should
 

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I have put it to max i am aware of the need to allow water to flow to allow boiler to cool once the required temperature is achieved thank you for your help much appreciated
 

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