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Recycling roof slates

Discussion in 'Roofing and Guttering' started by Grust, 22 Jan 2020.

  1. Grust

    Grust

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    I've hired a builder to renovate my cottage at a fixed contracted price and he has sub-contracted the roofing work. I agreed with the builder that the best slates from the front half should be replaced (on new battens) and the shortfall of reusable slates should be dealt with by taking decent ones from the back. Today after the roofers had left I went up on the scaffolding and this is what I found. Surely some of these slates going back on are beyond salvage? And what horrors lie beneath the area already covered? I anticipate a bit of an argument with the builder tomorrow and it would be great for my confidence if some of you found this as bad as I do. But I can take it if you think I'm making a fuss about nothing!

    IMG_20200122_154301357a_HDR.jpg IMG_20200122_154301357b_HDR.jpg
     
  2. oldbutnotdead

    oldbutnotdead

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    Not an expert point of view from me (so maybe don't attach too much weight to it) but that looks like a nice neat job- no random thickness slates kicking up, headlap is right, full size battens, looks like copper roofing nails rather than galvanised plasterboard nails, all good signs.
    May have been a mistake on his part doing it on a fixed price- his price probably assumes he could salvage x% of existing, actual slates in good nick is much less than x%. It might be worth having a chat to the roofer (whose work looks competent) and ask him if he's comfortable putting those gappy slates on- possibly meet him in the middle with the cost of additional slates to do it properly.
    Assuming the full roof on both sides has been stripped, he should have used the best slates lower down (where thay have to handle more water) and graduating upwards so you are probably seeing the worst slates so far.
     
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  4. palaceray

    palaceray

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    Every slate should have had new nail holes made in them. It is not acceptable to re-use the old huge holes as he has.
    There are a few slates on show that should not have been used, due to large top corners being broken or missing bottom corners.
     
  5. datarebal

    datarebal

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    Oh dear.
    firstly, as ray says they should be re holed
    there are three i would not use in the field, but use them for cuts.

    The way it works is thick slates to the bottom getting thinner as you go up.
    nails, copper, stainless or even alloy are fine.. But there are plenty of old roofs with galvanised.

    These slates need taking back off and put back with new nail holes made from the underside of the slate
     
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  7. Grust

    Grust

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    Thanks for all three responses. Much appreciated.
    Sad to say my gentle carefully worded complaint to the builder (main contractor) did not go down very well!
    As I write very little further work has taken place and I've been left with only the Tyvek between me and the elements over a large part of the roof.
    No, not even a tarp has been placed over it.
    The builder says he will be back tomorrow but no word from the roofers yet.
     
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