1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

Renovation of old metal window frames

Discussion in 'Your Projects' started by Blokky27, 14 Sep 2021.

  1. Blokky27

    Blokky27

    Joined:
    22 Jan 2021
    Messages:
    22
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Hello all

    I have an older property with some windows that don’t close properly probably due in part to years of neglect (we’ve only recently purchased it) and maybe too much paint? Now summer (I know it never started) is over, looking ahead to winter I need to sort these out as they’re in a child’s bedroom. Ideally we would replace but the property is listed so that would take forever so instead looking to fix them up for now. Has anyone got any experience of similar? Any tips on what I need to do to get them working and/or suggestions on what products I should use (and avoid!)

    thanks in advance!

    4C1E9502-FCB0-4FC7-B378-8337A0DC74EE.jpeg 80195BED-7623-4176-AB44-7FAE1E035C5B.jpeg
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

    Joined:
    22 Jul 2016
    Messages:
    4,468
    Thanks Received:
    723
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  4. Blokky27

    Blokky27

    Joined:
    22 Jan 2021
    Messages:
    22
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks - will try this stuff. Have another room she can move to whilst I do this. Will it likely take several goes with the paint stripper or should it get through it all in one go? And presumably once I've got it back to metal, I'm ok to put a single new layer of paint on without blocking the hinge mechanism again?
     
  5. Blokky27

    Blokky27

    Joined:
    22 Jan 2021
    Messages:
    22
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Looking for paint strippers, I also came across discs for an angle grinder that are designed for taking paint off metal. Looks very easy and quick in the video (I know, they always look easy in the promotional stuff). Has anyone tried these and are they any good? OK to use with a mask to protect me, or should I stick with the stripper recommended by Tigercubrider?
     
  6. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

    Joined:
    22 Jul 2016
    Messages:
    4,468
    Thanks Received:
    723
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The paint stripping discs work well on paint/primer but your frames may be galvanised.
    The disc won't work on ares like the hinges
     
    Last edited: 14 Sep 2021
  7. Sponsored Links
  8. opps

    opps

    Joined:
    16 Jun 2006
    Messages:
    4,973
    Thanks Received:
    793
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    If you use those grinding discs you are likely to cut through the galvanised protective coating. You may then find that the metal will rust. Other than damaging the galvanised finish, you will generate a LOT of dust (some of which may contain years old lead paint).

    Methyl chloride (MC) paint strippers are the best I have personally used. They were banned from DIY paint strippers
    because the MC may be carcinogenic. The use of the italics is because of "potential" exposure levels. Cigarettes are carcinogenic, but I am not aware of anything to suggest that one or two will cause cancer.

    Technically, MC strippers are only supposed to be sold to professionals and in quantities of 5L or more, but you can find them on ebay in 1L containers. When working with them indoors (whilst the customers are away, I wear a charcoal filtered mask- outdoors, I don't bother).

    BTW the one recommended by Tigercubrider is MC based.

    FYI the windows are often called Crittal windows. I have no idea if they were the only company that made them, or whether, it became a generic term for those kind of metal windows.

    Looking at image number 1, and ignoring the state of the paint, it does look like someone has abused the retaining frame. I have only ever repainted them, I have never tried to "adjust" them. If you have recently moved from a house with double glazing, you might never be happy with the Crittal windows. You may want to consider "secondary glazing". It is what most of my customers in listed (grade 2) buildings end up opting for. Thermally, it will never be as good as double glazing but it may cut down on noise, condensation and draughts.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  9. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

    Joined:
    30 Dec 2018
    Messages:
    6,987
    Thanks Received:
    1,004
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Tho look like Crittal windows, if so - you can still get parts for them.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  10. Blokky27

    Blokky27

    Joined:
    22 Jan 2021
    Messages:
    22
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kent
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks for all the input. I will definitely go with some of the recommended stripper then - sounds like it gets a unanimous vote in from you guys.

    What do you mean by "abused the retaining frame". That aside, my plan is to try and strip as much paint off as I can to the point where they at least close properly or as near as is possible with this type of frame. Then add in something between the window and the frame to try and improve the seal (pretty sure they won't have a decent seal after all these years, or if they ever did - any recommendations here?). And yes, some sort of secondary glazing also sounds like a good idea.
     
  11. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

    Joined:
    30 Dec 2018
    Messages:
    6,987
    Thanks Received:
    1,004
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    You can buy a sticky backed, easy to compress foam around 6mm wide in a roll, that might do it.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  12. opps

    opps

    Joined:
    16 Jun 2006
    Messages:
    4,973
    Thanks Received:
    793
    Location:
    London
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    The foam recommended by Harry is probably the easiest option.

    The current state of the windows however suggests that condensation has been an ongoing issue. Two people in a room pump out a lot of moisture when they breathe at night, hopefully a little person on their own will produce less moisture, especially if the bedroom door is left open.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
Loading...

Share This Page