Repairing the verges

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Hi,

Looking for a bit of advice on getting my roof repaired. 1950s extended semi.

Excuse any incorrectly terminology but as you can see from the photos, mortar is cracked/missing in places on my verges and mortar is cracked/missing in places on the tile undercloak. I'm not sure why there is so much depth to the undercloak and overhang of the tiles. As it looks like most houses of my street have the mortar and tiles sat directly on top of the brickwork? Anyway, I've had 3 quotes for repairing this.

1. £350 - installation of dry verge (doesn't think he needs scaffolding) - well rated roofer on checkatrade but can find no other details about him
2. £1900 - installation of dry verge (with scaffolding) and thinks he needs to cut tiles back first as there is a big overhang - a home improvement firm that a friend of a friend knows
3. £2200 - install of dry verge - very well rated roofer on checkatrade - has quoted purely on photos!

Incredible difference in the prices above - The £350 seems ridiculously cheap, the other two seem expensive. I know checkatrade and the like are not often recommended for finding reputable tradespeople but struggling to find any good recommendations from friends/family - I'll have a local firm mentioned but then a quick Google will chuck up loads of bad reviews.

Any thoughts welcome.

Thanks

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Hi,

Only a DIY'er, so feel free to ignore! :)
...and sorry, I don't want to sound preachy!
Personally, I have disregarded quotes, where a roofer has said they didn't need scaffolding.
The cost is less, but what regard does that show for their and their employees safety?
HSE doesn't forbid the use of ladders, but they should only be used "for low-risk, short-duration tasks, although they should not automatically be your first choice."
 
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Apologies. Thought you meant square to existing wall. The extension isn't square. it is slightly wider at the rear compared to the front - guessing it was done this way to follow the property boundary line and maximise space.
 
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Your local council might run a 'trusted trader' section on their website. Again, although not full-proof, the companies have usually been vetted by local trading standards and reviews are usually left by previous customers.
 
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I strongly suspect anyone stating that they want to fit a dry verge, really mean that they just want to try and cover the tiles and wall joint with a dry verge and be gone by 12:00.

That verge is going to need a bit of work to make good the wall below the tiles, and normally altering a verge like that to a dry verge also needs extending the tile battens and fitting felt/ membrane over the cavity. Most of this should be done from the side not the roof, so requires scaffold. New battens may need to go across two rafters, if so , that's over one metre of tiles to come off all the way up the roof. That's rarely in the Checkatrade brochure.

Either specify the work or get more details on what is being quoted for. You don't want to be in a position where you get quoted for a dry verge fitting and then once the tiles are off, the bloke says "You need all the battens extending and felting mate, so I need to double the price."

And ask for photos of the work in progress showing all the verge, the new battens and new felt and making good to the wall - not just a few close zoomed in images of one end of a batten.
 
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I strongly suspect anyone stating that they want to fit a dry verge, really mean that they just want to try and cover the tiles and wall joint with a dry verge and be gone by 12:00.

That verge is going to need a bit of work to make good the wall below the tiles, and normally altering a verge like that to a dry verge also needs extending the tile battens and fitting felt/ membrane over the cavity. Most of this should be done from the side not the roof, so requires scaffold. New battens may need to go across two rafters, if so , that's over one metre of tiles to come off all the way up the roof. That's rarely in the Checkatrade brochure.

Either specify the work or get more details on what is being quoted for. You don't want to be in a position where you get quoted for a dry verge fitting and then once the tiles are off, the bloke says "You need all the battens extending and felting mate, so I need to double the price."

And ask for photos of the work in progress showing all the verge, the new battens and new felt and making good to the wall - not just a few close zoomed in images of one end of a batten.
Thanks. Very helpful and sounds like that's what the £350 guy would be doing, i.e. just hiding the issue with the caps.

Do you think sticking with the traditional wet mortar verge would be a better option? Would be more aesthetically pleasing and presumably a much easier (and cheaper) job (albeit would need re-doing at some point again in the future).

Thanks
 
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Yes a wet verge is infinitely better.

Have a look at how many plastic verges have a few pieces missing after a while, or how they have faded after a few years. And how ugly they are with those monstrous pieces

A wet verge should be lasting at least 30 years, normally longer - how old is your roof for instance.

The problem is, and admittedly its a big problem, is finding someone able to do a wet verge and do it properly. That's probably why none of your "roofers" have actually quoted you for a wet verge - they are not proper roofers!

If you are going to have a dry verge, I would suggest a continuous dry verge. I only specify them nowadays as they have none of the issues of pieces coming loose, and they can look a lot better. But with yours, a wet verge would be preferable in terms of appearance.
 

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