Replacing a shower valve.

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I currently have a Triton Cassini exposed thermostatic mixer shower on the first floor.

We have a combi boiler in the kitchen and a new mixer shower in the attic floor.

The first floor shower runs fine in the summer but is not going to be hot enough for the coming months' weather. I mentioned this when the other shower was fitted and they advised me that the thermostatic cartridge was probably gone in the Triton Cassini and needed replacing. In fact, this isn't particularly cost-effective on an old shower because of the high price of the part, so I was thinking of replacing the whole thing.

Do I definitely need a thermostatic mixer shower as the replacement?

I have seen a good price on a Grohe Avensys thermostatic mixer shower which looks like it would be an easy swap, but the recommended pressure for it is 0.1 - 5.0 bar. We seem to have pretty high pressure, but how can I gauge (cheaply!) whether this one would do?

Is it a DIY job to swap or will I really need an experienced plumber?

Is Grohe Avensys any good, or would I be as well either paying more (people seem to recommend Miras a lot) or else getting a non-thermostatic mixer?

We only have both showers going at the same time occasionally, but it's nice to be able to do so.

Thanks for any advice.
 
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Just to say: the pressure gauge on the combi boiler itself is 1 bar when the hot water is on. I've no idea whether that's indicative of the water pressure in our system.
 
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The gauge on the boiler gives no indication of your incoming mains water pressure I'm affraid
I'm certain there is nothing in the building/water regs the stipulate that you have to have a thermostatic shower however due to variations in water pressure and volumes on the cold water supply without the aid of the thermostat you are at risk of being scalding if you fit a standard mixer shower
 
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Thanks for the advice.

If anyone can tell me whether the Grohe one is likely to be any good, and whether it'd be easy to fit myself, I'd be grateful.

Thanks.
 
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Hans grohe are a very reputable up market brand
Fitting the shower depends on your level of confidence and plumbing skills
 
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I'm all confidence, but don't know a great deal about plumbing. I was hoping someone would say "Turn the water off, drain the shower, unscrew those nuts, take the old one off and screw the new one on. Turn the water back on". Is there a lot more to it than that!?

I'm now wondering whether to just replace the thermostatic cartridge after all. I've taken the thing apart before for other reasons, so I'm confident there.

Just the difference in cost is not massive when considering a total replacement. If I replace the cartridge and it's still not hot, I won't have saved anything, whereas a completely new one means, well, a completely working one, with all new parts, I hope.
 

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