Replacing blade in circular saw

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I also agree that the Comes With the tool keys & spanners were/are mostly a waste of time.
I have to admit that I have frequently lost 'on tool' Allen keys - so I carry a half decent set in my pull along box (useful for lock fitting, adjusting ally doors, etc) which sorts the issue.
 
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Post #15, what is your point? Please explain?
The OP asked a question - I answered his question.
Yes you gave him advice, and then precededed to have a go at at me for giving a slick answer, and accusing me of not knowing how to change a blade, the reason i gave the slick answer was because i could clearly see a new blade on it, and the poster has a history of stupid questions, or winding us up.
 
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To make sure blade is right way round, have arrow and teeth pointing some way I guess. Just finger tight when putting nut on View attachment 292535

Both the saw and the blade have arrows that need to "point" in the same direction.

BTW, that blade is for fibreboards- cement board or laminates/etc. When you next use it, Trend recommend that the teeth only poke out under the board being cut by 1mm.

Nah, I didn't already know that, I just googled the blade number.

 
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Fair enough - I've never experienced it but I've read reports of it happening.
The reports were in a professional trade journal.

I also agree that the Comes With the tool keys & spanners were/are mostly a waste of time.

I am not doubting you, but which trade journal covers such topics?

I occasionally pick up the free mag from the likes of my electrical or builders' merchant, but they are little more than trade mags that exist to promote products.

As someone that once used to advertise in trade pet product magazines (and occasionally in retail pet mags), I am aware that the editorial teams will select one of your products to mention positively in articles (whilst you are still paying for advertising though), I cannot recall any such publication being critical of a given product (by name) unless the courts have made a negative ruling (and there was no chance of that firm ever advertising in their publication).

Perhaps you read a "promoted" article that was an infomercial for an advertiser that wanted to promote the longevity of that particular part of their circular saw... and which suggested that all other saws have inferior hex screws.
 
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I also agree that the Comes With the tool keys & spanners were/are mostly a waste of time.

I recent purchased a Souber door lock morticer. The supplied spanner is incredibly tight. Am happy with the tool, but I may file a smidgen off the jaws of the spanner.

My bigger gripe is the quality of screws provided with door furniture. Yesterday, I had to fit a padlock slide bolt for a mate. I drilled pilot holes and tightened the screws by hand, the heads still cammed out slightly.
 
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BTW, that blade is for fibreboards- cement board or laminates/etc. When you next use it, Trend recommend that the teeth only poke out under the board being cut by 1mm.
Do I get the impression you've never cut cement fibreboard? Horrible stuff. It always feels like it is about to kick back on you, and the dust it generates is really cloying - even with a decent dust extractor and a well fitted P3 mask you still taste it at the end of the day. It will also make the saw run a bit hotter
 
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My bigger gripe is the quality of screws provided with door furniture.
I think we're in agreement there - some firms supply really nasty cream cheese stainless steel screws, and why do manufacturers think it is OK to supply a lock with Phillips screws, but the "matching" keep with Pozi screws? [/RANT_OFF]
 
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Post #22,
I subscribe to a number of professional magazines & their web sites- you might learn much if you advanced beyond picking up free copies of whatever you are referring to?
For instance, the letter pages of the magazines I refer to are full of technical rants and often video'ed
complaints regarding tools and materials.
Perhaps you had not considered that professional journals have letter's pages?
 
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Post #22,
I subscribe to a number of professional magazines & their web sites- you might learn much if you advanced beyond picking up free copies of whatever you are referring to?
For instance, the letter pages of the magazines I refer to are full of technical rants and often video'ed
complaints regarding tools and materials.
Perhaps you had not considered that professional journals have letter's pages?

If you assume that my knowledge is limited to reading adverts in the free magazines handed out at suppliers, you are mistaken.

I misunderstood your use of the term "professional trade journal", I hadn't realised that you meant that you subscribe to over the counter magazines.

That said, I suspect that no other human could amass as much knowledge as you regardless of how many "professional trade journals" they read.

Out of interest, what is, or was, your trade? My bread and butter is decorating but over the years I have worked for cabinetmakers, lift engineers and general builders.
 
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Do I get the impression you've never cut cement fibreboard? Horrible stuff. It always feels like it is about to kick back on you, and the dust it generates is really cloying - even with a decent dust extractor and a well fitted P3 mask you still taste it at the end of the day. It will also make the saw run a bit hotter

I once tiled a bathroom that required cement board around the bath area only years ago, from memory, I used a jigsaw with a carbide blade. It was slow but there wasn't much to cut.

Based on your experience, I hope I never need to use my circular saw to cut the stuff.
 
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We did a bit over16,000 square feet of it on one job - or rather my lads did most of it after I had done the first (double sized) apartment to "prove the principle" as well as the last 6 apartments at the very end of the job. I had a Bosch GKT55CE saw and tracks, PCD blades and a Festool CTM36AE dust extractor. It's not only nasty stuff to cut, because of the dust, but in 15mm and above thicknesses it's ruddy heavy
 

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