Replacing floor in 1930's house

J5

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Hi All

I'm just after some thoughts and opinions.

Last weekend we lifted the laminate floor at my parents house in the living room. We did this as the floor was giving quite badly. What we found was wood worm had turned the marine ply floor to dust. I put my foot through it without effort, the laminate actually had more structural integrity than the floor boards. We got as far as 3m by 3m and need to investigate further to see how far it has spread. The floor boards are just over 20 years old. We actually changed them ourselves as the previous owner had used chipboard which had rotted. Ventilation is ok but we've sussed how to get some extra air bricks in this time. Surprisingly the joists seems to have been unscathed.

So our options as far as I can see are as follows...

1) Treat joists for woodworm (Soluguard?) and replace all floorboards again. Marine ply seems like straightforward choice. However, is P5 tongue and groove chipboard a suitable alternative, I've never used it? Is there anything to be gained by spending more and going for old fashioned tongue and groove. Are the relative costs per square meter majorly different?

2) Have a builder fill the floor a modern insulated concrete floor slab. What are the implications of doing this and is it actually even an option?

Would appreciate any advice.

Thanks
Jas
 
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One other consideration?

If you infill this floor, are there any other rooms sited to the rear of the affected room that [in effect] rely on underfloor ventilation from the room that you are contemplating infilling?

Ken.
 

J5

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One other consideration?

If you infill this floor, are there any other rooms sited to the rear of the affected room that [in effect] rely on underfloor ventilation from the room that you are contemplating infilling?

Ken.

It's a good point and a weird feature of the house . The rest is concrete already as it was built later on. The living room used to be a shop which we believe belonged to the neighbouring attached house. Then at some point lost in the history books my parents house was built around it.
 
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