Repurposing old pantry as walk-in shower

Joined
31 May 2022
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Country
United Kingdom
I've got an old bottom floor Tyneside flat, where the bathroom is directly off from the kitchen. Original layout included a pantry in a long alcove off the kitchen, which I've blocked off to provide a larger usable floor space in the kitchen and knocked into it from the bathroom.

Remodel.jpg


Hoping to create a walk-in shower in the new space, but just wanted to see if anyone can see any obvious problems before I pull the trigger.

WalkInShower.jpg


That's how it looks at the minute. The stud wall part (and the ceiling) is a proper dreadful job, but seems solid, and I'd really (really) rather not take it down. Without taking it down, I'm limited to the space that's there already, which would allow me a 700mm width shower tray. Maybe a bit narrow, but I can live with that. Here's what I was planning to do:

1. Attach studs to brick wall at back and right boundary, so I can install Aquapanel. Can only fit 38 x 63 studs.

2. Install drainage below suspended timber floor. There was a small shower enclosure in the bathroom originally, now removed. Drainage pipework is still there, so hopefully can use that. If not, it's going straight out the back wall directly behind the shower itself.

3. Install low-profile shower tray and level.

4. Attach Aquapanel. There's a chance that the tray itself might be a few mm wider than the panelled walls. If that's the case, I'll cut the panels so that they sit on the top of the tray. First fix plumbing behind 700mm panel.

Should look something like this at this point:
ShowerEnclosure_Plan.jpg
ShowerEnclosure_ISO.jpg



5. Seal with something like Classi seal, attached to the panels and to the top of the tray.

6. Pay someone to tile it.

That sound alright? Am I missing anything really obvious? Are the studs too thin? Do I only need Aquapanel where water is likely to ingress, or am I better using Aquapanel on the whole length of the wall? Do I need to bother with Aquapanel on the ceiling? They also sell some kind of Aquapanel floor panels, do I need to set the tray on those? Lighting not an issue, and there'll be a low voltage extractor ducted through the false ceiling and out.

Cheers!
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
10 Dec 2021
Messages
123
Reaction score
34
Country
United Kingdom
Your all good there. You have thought it through very well. Love the cad work! No need for aqua panel on ceiling. It’s only really designed for walls to be tiled. The studs are fine. It’s cheaper to use moisture resist plasterboard for the other bits but perfectly fine to use aquaboard on the whole wall if you prefer. If you are tiling yeh floor, just ply the floor and screw down like mad. Great job. Send pics when done!
 
Joined
29 Jan 2008
Messages
1,778
Reaction score
268
Location
Liverpool
Country
United Kingdom
Appreciate the wall on the left of the shower is likely there because of the pipe work, but I would suggest you make at least part of that wall as a glass screen.

It will allow the shower to be much less claustrophobic, and will likely be cheaper than the stud wall/aqua board/tiles. Glass screens on eBay are as cheap as chips.
 
Joined
29 Jan 2008
Messages
1,778
Reaction score
268
Location
Liverpool
Country
United Kingdom
Or extend that wall/screen on the left only to 800mm and allow entry to the shower from the side rather than the end only.

That way you could put a cupboard or shelves at the end and utilise that space better for storage of towels, etc
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
10 Dec 2021
Messages
123
Reaction score
34
Country
United Kingdom
@kingandy2nd This is solid advice I would second. Would be a good improvement to the feng shuis and probably cheaper and faster too. Check the story of the stud to see if it’s making any structural contributions to the upstairs or that beam etc - hard to see from pic but taking it all out is 15 mins work. No big deal.
 
Joined
15 Dec 2008
Messages
541
Reaction score
8
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
I've got an old bottom floor Tyneside flat, where the bathroom is directly off from the kitchen. Original layout included a pantry in a long alcove off the kitchen, which I've blocked off to provide a larger usable floor space in the kitchen and knocked into it from the bathroom.

View attachment 271162

Hoping to create a walk-in shower in the new space, but just wanted to see if anyone can see any obvious problems before I pull the trigger.

View attachment 271161

That's how it looks at the minute. The stud wall part (and the ceiling) is a proper dreadful job, but seems solid, and I'd really (really) rather not take it down. Without taking it down, I'm limited to the space that's there already, which would allow me a 700mm width shower tray. Maybe a bit narrow, but I can live with that. Here's what I was planning to do:

1. Attach studs to brick wall at back and right boundary, so I can install Aquapanel. Can only fit 38 x 63 studs.

2. Install drainage below suspended timber floor. There was a small shower enclosure in the bathroom originally, now removed. Drainage pipework is still there, so hopefully can use that. If not, it's going straight out the back wall directly behind the shower itself.

3. Install low-profile shower tray and level.

4. Attach Aquapanel. There's a chance that the tray itself might be a few mm wider than the panelled walls. If that's the case, I'll cut the panels so that they sit on the top of the tray. First fix plumbing behind 700mm panel.

Should look something like this at this point:
View attachment 271165 View attachment 271166


5. Seal with something like Classi seal, attached to the panels and to the top of the tray.

6. Pay someone to tile it.

That sound alright? Am I missing anything really obvious? Are the studs too thin? Do I only need Aquapanel where water is likely to ingress, or am I better using Aquapanel on the whole length of the wall? Do I need to bother with Aquapanel on the ceiling? They also sell some kind of Aquapanel floor panels, do I need to set the tray on those? Lighting not an issue, and there'll be a low voltage extractor ducted through the false ceiling and out.

Cheers!
What are you using to create your plans? Look really good.
 

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Top