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Rnning a 500w rice cooker from a 5 amp rated socket

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by pappyon, 10 Sep 2010.

  1. pappyon

    pappyon

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    When I got new central heating in I utilised the connection where the old boiler thermostat in the kitchen had been by converting the outlet into a socket for a table lamp etc.

    Problem is it's only rated at 5amps on the fuse board.

    My question is could I run a 500 watt rice cooker from this socket or would the RCB just trip?
     
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  3. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    Is the circuit RCD protected?

    Did you check that the EFLI was low enough for the faster disconnection times needed for portable appliances?

    Did you apply for Building Regulations approval?


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watt

    Do you think you should be doing electrical work if you don't know basic things like the relationship between volts, amps and watts?
     
  4. pappyon

    pappyon

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    What a twisted sarcastic person you are! Does it give you a kick to put people down?

    What's wrong did you put your false prosthetic on the wrong leg this morning?

    But then I remember I have had dealings with you before!

    I'm only running a table lamp off the socket, not a 1000 volt transformer
     
  5. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    PrenticeBoyofDerry

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    Simple calculation
    would be
    Power/Volts=current
    500/230=2.17
    So this socket will be fine to use for this appliance, but if you put a 3Amp fuse in the plug top, it can be used at any suitable socket outlet.
    I assume that your installation has been done to requirements and complies to part p. With correct documentation being issued.
    No sarcasm mean't, just the interest of your safety.
     
  6. ban-all-sheds

    ban-all-sheds

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    There was nothing twisted or sarcastic about what I wrote, nor was I trying to put you down.

    You did things which have genuine safety implications where getting it wrong could kill someone, and which, like it or not, have laws which apply to them. (The latter in E&W - to be fair I don't know if you're in Scotland or NI, so you may not be bound by them, but the same is not true of the electrical engineering principles behind disconnection times)

    So in what way was it sarcastic, twisted or a put-down to ask if you'd taken any notice of any of the safety regulations which applied to what you did?

    In what way was it sarcastic, twisted or a put-down to ask you to stop and consider if you really should be doing electrical work, given that you don't know some very basic things, and that doing such work when you are ignorant is not a sensible course of action?


    Is that the limit of your ability to contribute intelligently and rationally to discussions here?

    I'd love to see you explain how, even if I did have a false prosthetic leg (or a real prosthetic one), that would mean that your circuit would be safe no matter what the fault loop impedance was. :LOL:


    Please show how that means that the regulations pertaining to whether the protective device will work properly don't apply.
     
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  8. echoes

    echoes

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    A 13A socket on a circuit designed to carry 5A is not right.
    Putting a 3A fuse in the plug would not prevent anyone plugging in a kettle and overloading the circuit.
    A fuse is there to protect against fault or overload of a properly designed circuit, not as a an elastoplast to make a poor design 'safe'.
     
  9. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    PrenticeBoyofDerry

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  10. Damocles

    Damocles

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    I shouldnt let myself get carried away over things like this, having just come here for a query and not having done any wiring lately, so who knows what new exciting rules may have been introduced. The main thing wrong with wiring standards in use 50 + years ago was the poor quality of the rubber cables, which fell to pieces over time. Anything wired in pvc done competently for the regulations in force at that time should be very safe. Naturally, beetles crawl into sockets and die, mice eat cables and so forth, but if anyone did an installation to those exact same standards nowadays it would still be very safe. Many additional safety regulations having been added since notwithstanding. The law is one thing, but those insisting the vital safety need for this and that sometimes need a bit of perspective.

    A 13A socket is rated to carry 13A without catching fire. It is thus perfectly safe attached to a circuit only capable of supplying 5A.

    If a circuit was originally designed with some sort of 5A protective device which was deemed safe for the cabling provided, then it still is whatever is attached on the end.

    If you plug something in and it keeps tripping, then maybe the penny should drop that you are overloading it and should change something, but it is designed to be safe despite abuse. All socket circuits work on the principle that you will not choose to plug in too big a load at one time.

    If you did these alterations to the socket long enough ago, not only was it safe but it was even legal.

    If it was me, Id have originally run the boiler supply in 2.5 cable despite using a 5A breaker, but that wasnt the question either.

    Yes you could run the cooker. No it wouldnt trip.
     
  11. echoes

    echoes

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    I stand by my comment about 13A sockets on 5A circuits, but having re-read what the OP was proposing i.e. a 5A plug and socket (round-pin) and not a 13A socket (my bad), can't see anything objectionable.
     
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