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Rock dust - fab for garden, could stop global warming

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by Min, 25 Mar 2005.

  1. Min

    Min

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  3. kevplumb

    kevplumb

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    makes sense when you think about it :)
     
  4. Min

    Min

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    Yeah it does.

    Resigned from my job yesterday so got four weeks gardening leave before the new one starts :D :D :D :D

    Might see if I can get some of the dust and, you know, have a trial, grow large onions and save the planet.
     
  5. 2scoops0406

    2scoops0406

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    Let us know how you get on, never used it myself, but would be interested in the results.

    :D
     
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  7. Thermo

    Thermo

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    cant really see how they can claim it as that much of a breakthrough, havnt they been farming in volcanic rock dust for thousands of years eg on the sides of vesuvious? (still a bit safer though!)
     
  8. Dewy

    Dewy

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    The only reason I can see of rock dust helping is that it aerates the soil giving bacteria a better environment in which to thrive.
    Soil is a mixture of rock dust from erosion and decomposed animal and vegetable matter.
    Volcanic ash contains a great deal of minerals so therefore improves fertility.
    10 years ago I dug out all the clay soil in my flower beds and mixed it with equal parts of sharp sand (stone dust) and peat and compost.
    I made a large sieve framed around a wheelbarrow and passed the mixture through this before returning it to the flower beds.
    This has become a beautiful loam soil which gets top dressed with garden compost each year.
     
  9. Scoby_Beasley

    Scoby_Beasley

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    Wish I'd done that Dewy, I've always (here two years) dug out a bigger/deeper hole than required, got rid of the solid clay bits, mixed the remainder with soil improver (by bucket !), sharp sand and a bit of pea grit. Wished I'd done the whole borders now as when you get a new plant it's bloody awkward in our (deliberate) jungle of a garden :(
     
  10. 2scoops0406

    2scoops0406

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    Perhaps one for us budding ('cuse pun) gardeners to try and report back on, I must admit the article strays rather into the pseudo science bit, but hey, don't knock it if you aint tried it.
     
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