Rot in purlin?

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Evening all,
Just went up to the loft to get something and noticed the rear purlin looking a bit dodgy (see photo). It doesn't feel wet or soft / brittle but something ain't right.

The thrown together structural work was there when we moved in (surveyor said it was "in a serviceable condition") and tbh we need to get the brickwork patched up. Is it worth getting someone in to take a proper look?

Ta
 
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Looks like the purlin needed strengthening but they took the easy route of sistering the rafters and wedging off cuts underneath. Is the purlin sagging at mid span?

Blup
 
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I'd want to take a peek in stormy wet weather. Or shove wodges of loo paper in. It shows if it's been wet.
 
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When did you move into the property? Was it noted on the survey that work has been carried out on the roof timbers? The picture shows that the purlin has dropped and being propped up with timber, this to me should of being written down in the survey.

Andy
 
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Purlins are usually built into a pocket in the wall to prevent rotation. Its been propped at least twice judging by the old and newer wood used. The metal plate set into the wall looks a proper bodge. Has the roof been replaced with modern, heavier tiles.

Get a structural engineer in to take a look.

Blup
 
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Looks like the purlin needed strengthening but they took the easy route of sistering the rafters and wedging off cuts underneath. Is the purlin sagging at mid span?

Blup
Nope, it seems to be straight.

I don't think I was clear enough earlier (sorry) - I was aware of the bodge job done with the newer timbers and was planning on getting that sorted in the longer term, probably when getting the loft conversion done. What I was concerned about in the immediate future was the discolouration of the purlin, i.e. is it rotting and needs to be sorted ASAP. I don't remember it looking like that last time I looked which was a few months ago, but can't be sure.

Structural engineer is probably a good idea anyway though...
 
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Nope, it seems to be straight.

I don't think I was clear enough earlier (sorry) - I was aware of the bodge job done with the newer timbers and was planning on getting that sorted in the longer term, probably when getting the loft conversion done. What I was concerned about in the immediate future was the discolouration of the purlin, i.e. is it rotting and needs to be sorted ASAP. I don't remember it looking like that last time I looked which was a few months ago, but can't be sure.

Structural engineer is probably a good idea anyway though...


The streaks on the wall, and white residue/discolouration on the purlin end suggest the rain has got in, whether that it is recent or not is difficult to tell. Was the roof felted and retiled in the recent past? If the wood feels solid and not flaky or rotten, there is probably nothing to worry about. But the bodging of the sistered rafters and supports would benefit from an expert eye, as we cannot judge the state of the entire roof.

Blup
 
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Thanks everyone. Going to get a structural engineer in to take a look. Hopefully it's stable / watertight enough to last a couple of years until we get the loft converted properly...if not, bye bye Xmas bonus (and then some). Sigh.
 
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Looks like something to do with a previously removed chimney stack (would explain the water staining). If it's securely resting on that brickwork on the right and that continues down to the ground then it can't really go anywhere and should be ok in the short term. A good poke with a screwdriver will establish the condition of the timber.

I do like that jiffy hanger nailed to the brickwork.

Screenshot_20211107-102506.png
 
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As long as it can't slip off that supporting wall then I wouldn't be too concerned, as others have said just take a look when its raining hard to see if you have a leak.
 

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