Routers

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by Tigger90, 13 Feb 2010.

  1. Tigger90

    Tigger90

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    I have fitted all my base cupboards and now need to fit the 40mm laminate worktops.

    Now, what are routers like to use? A case of holding said router on the wood and it propels itself along? I know I will need a jig...
     
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  3. big-all

    big-all

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    heeelllooo Tigger90
    your comments frighten me a little bit lol :D

    in the book off cutting worktops with a router where the worktop cutting is on page 37 of volume c
    you are on page 3 off volume "A" with pictures off wood types

    what are your experiences off routers !!
    you need to handle around 6.5kg machine with a 1/2" cutter wizzing around at 24.000 rpm
    you need several hours off practice as basic routering to get used to the machine and how to use it
    you also need to know the basic rules off router cutters in relation to various materials ect

    basic package of half inch router cutter and jig around £300 iff you are still interested will tell you in more detail

    ;)
     
  4. chippie244

    chippie244

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    If you haven't used a router before an expensive worktop isn't the place to start your learning curve.
    To do a good job you would need to spend around £200 on a router, £75 on a jig and £25 on a cutter + clamps and colorfill.
    A kitchen fitter or an experienced carpenter would probably charge you around £50 per joint so unless you've got more than 6 joints to cut or you intend to do this a lot I would leave it up to the professionals.
    You've got someone to blame then if it's not as you like.
     
  5. chippie244

    chippie244

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    You type faster than me Big All :D
     
  6. big-all

    big-all

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    definatly dont type faster lol i just got there first i use one finger lol
    if i try and use 2 fingers i get confused and start typing gobbldygook twice as fast as normal :D :D :cool:

    much better with 2 points off veiw the same as it bears more weight and gets the point recognised
    although i think i was a bit unfair he is probably on volume b page 20 "THE REALY DODGY HAND HELD ELECTRIC TOOLS SECTION" lol :LOL: :LOL:
     
  7. Blagard

    Blagard

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    Tigger90

    I don't have a professional quality router and have only used it on timber (no manmade boards etc) for a handful of jobs. But what I do know is the cheap ones are really crap, I did buy one once and ended up throwing it away. The tool itself needs to be treated with considerable care and respect. You will do more harm than good with it when you first use it - So the Guys are right - Just don't think about using one on your worktop if you have not handled one before.

    I did my own kitchen a long time ago with the tools available before routers really made an impact on the DIY market. By all means employ a professional to do the joints or if you are not prepared to pay them use tools you can use already. Routers are a fast way for professionals to get virtually perfect joints in worktops. You will probably get your best results with a saw and plane if you take your time. I would be embarrassed to say how old my kitchen is now, but not a single bit of worktop has opened up or allowed water ingress so I know the DIY'er can get there with the right approach.

    I hope that when you say you have fitted all your base units that they are all perfectly plumb and level, because you want that top to fit on every one without gaps, twists or falls etc. So check that before proceeding to the top. The top should sit on the carcass perfectly so the later fixings appear to do nothing more than to stop the top sliding around. Accept nothing less. When you fit the doors and drawers you will curse yourself if you have not done those checks now while you can correct or adjust the carcass.

    Good luck with your project :)
     
  8. Tigger90

    Tigger90

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    Thanks all, this female will be sticking with using her brand new hand saw!

    I have 2 joins to do, but have been quoted £300-400 quid for this. And that was the guys who were not too busy to do the job.. they would to prefer to install the whole kitchen. I fitted my old kitchen before and that lasted 15 years, so this one should last the same.....

    I just wanted to know what using a router was like, maybe I should have just looked on you tube rather than asking the question!
     
  9. gorgeousgordy

    gorgeousgordy

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    Where abouts in the UK are you?
     
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  11. Tigger90

    Tigger90

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    Guernsey, Channel Islands.

    It very expensive for all building works overhere!
     
  12. Master of None

    Master of None

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    I managed to do a good job of my 2 joints and sink and hob cut outs with some experience of a router. Then bashed a finished worktop lifting it into place. :oops: Then made an error cutting the replacement which was a more complicated cut because it was the piece between the two finished bits. :oops: In total this cost me.
    Router £160
    Jig £40
    Cutters £40
    Clamps £10
    Colorfill £14
    G clamps £10? (already owned)
    Replace Damaged Worktops £70
    Replace Colorfill £14
    Transport replacement worktops £40
    1 slab of beer after damaging replacement worktop £18
    1 Lost morning at work after slab of beer after damaging replacement worktop £50
    Time 4 Days (the time soon vanishes due to inexperience and out of square walls
    £398 not including last 2 items.
    £274 if I had not damage one.

    Solution.
    Get someone in.
    Make clear in advance for that price you want a perfect job with warrantee.
    Or.
    Fit joining strips yourself.

    Not trying to be negative but its a right ball (and head) buster of a job.

    PS £300-400 seems a bit steep about 18 months ago a pal of mine in glasgow got someone in to do 2 joints for £120 total for a cracking job.
    However someone in the trade here may be able to give you a ball park figure for your area.
     
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  13. big-all

    big-all

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  14. gregers

    gregers

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    is there not a place where you live who will cut the joint PROPERLY,leaving you to cut it all to size,round my way there is such a place and iirc they charge somewhere in the 50-60 pounds per joint,this way you will get the professional finish you require without buggering up the expensive worktops,

    i take my hat off to you for wanting to attempt this job,;)

    its just this is 1 of the jobs best left to the peeps with the most experience.

    i have to agree with all the other posts that a router is not the tool to be in anyones hands without prior experience.
    ive been using them for around 20 years and they still throw up surprises.
     
  15. Blagard

    Blagard

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  16. Tigger90

    Tigger90

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    That would be a good idea if we had somewhere over here that would cut the joints. I have asked at the timber merchants where I got the worktop from if they knew anyone that would do it for a reasonable price, but no luck.

    Don't fancy moving the worktops too far, as I have one length that needs cutting down to about 3.6m and the other one needs cutting in 2 to go at right angles to the large piece... this part of the kitchen is a "U" shape.
     
  17. big-all

    big-all

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