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Running cable under the Bath

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by 2000tdi, 25 Mar 2006.

  1. 2000tdi

    2000tdi

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    Hi there ,

    Just like to say what a great forum and useful information .
    Just after some advice with refernce to my kitchen wiring which is a mess since removing the tiles .

    I have a very old consumer unit .
    The cooker socket ( which is situated above my gas cooker ) feeds the cooker hood ( not via an FCU ). The same cooker socket also feeds a double socket below my worktop which is used for the washing machine , and of course the same socket feeds the gas cooker for the igniter .

    On the other side of the kitchen I have a double socket feeding a spur horizontally without any conduit but just plastered over . Also the Kitchen light switch cable also has no conduit and no sheathing on the cable .

    On top of that my lighting circuit does not have an earth .

    So here it goes
    1. I intend running a new cable for the light switch , directly above is the Bath , is there anything that I should take note of when running electrical cable under the floorboards directly below a bath .

    2.Is it possible to run a new cable from the consumer unit to just one Socket? Or to break into the main ring and use a junction box to feed a double socket .

    3. I have seen a wall chaser for £78 , are they any good and do they save a lot of time and effort.

    4. If I was to run 1.5mm T&E cable for my lighting circuit under my floorboards upstairs , does the cable need to be clipped down & does it need to be layed in any particular fashion .

    I know its a lot of information but my electrics seem to be in a mess , and the only electricians I have met so far are only interested in the Consumer unit job , but not the rest of it .
     
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  3. selfbuildy

    selfbuildy

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    Don't bother, use an angle grinder, put a black spur disc in it(about a quid) save u £77.

    Keep trying, tell him when u find him you will do all the messy work for him cause you want to use your new black spur disc ;)


    [/quote]
     
  4. 2000tdi

    2000tdi

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    Angle grinder , not a bad idea , Luckliy enough I purchased a Bosch one last week with stone cutting disks .

    I'll certainly give that a try .
     
  5. markie

    markie

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    If you use a grinder it will cerate a lot of dust, and when you have done the job you will not be able to see for a few hours :LOL:

    Just get a nicker and hammer just as quick and a lot less mess, ;)
     
  6. Adam_151

    Adam_151

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    Or an SDS with a chisel bit
     
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  8. 2000tdi

    2000tdi

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    I think your probably right , dont think the wife will be impressed with all the dust , one electrician said that he prefers to use a chisel action SDS Drill .
     
  9. markie

    markie

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    It's amazing who much dust is cerated when using a grinder, i use one a lot on roof tiles and cutting one tile would fill a room in no time they are ok out-doors but in door no way, unless the place is empty, dust get's every where, you spend more time cleaning the dust up than doing the job in the first place, ;)
     
  10. Jim2287

    Jim2287

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    we use bosch chaser with vacuum to suck up dust, pretty clean then, but if u are only DIYer then its a bit expensive
     
  11. tim-spam

    tim-spam

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    I think I've probably said this before, but I used an angle grinder to chase out channels in the wall..........once.
     
  12. JohnD

    JohnD

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    If it is your own house, and (1) you are not paying yourself by the hour (2) you don't want your hair, clothes, teeth, carpets, walls, floors, TV and ceilings to be coated with gritty dust, not just in the room where you are working but throughout the house:

    use a club hammer and a bolster, tap two parallel lines through the plaster and knock out the chase in the middle.
     
  13. DIYnot Local

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