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Salt/Damp in walls

Discussion in 'General DIY' started by bryn, 30 Aug 2005.

  1. bryn

    bryn

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    We live in a Grade 2 listed building and one room - which we think used to be a room for salting/curing meat is causing us problems. Because of this the paint is bubbling/peeling from the walls. Also we have a sandstone arch as a fireplace and parts of this is flaking and powdery. Again we think this is due to the salt. The room was totally re-plastered about 25 years ago. Any advice about how to cure / help with this problem would be much appreciated.
    Thanks for both suggestions. We already use a clay based paint but it has not worked. This stone built house is at least 500 yrs old therefore no dampcourse exists! Would some kind of sealant/barrier work and if so what kind?
    To answer some of the questions asked:-
    The house is stone built with walls approx. 2 feet thick.
    The floor is slate placed on soil.
    There is no DCP in a house of this age - at least 500yrs old.
    The room was re-plastered about 30 yrs ago with sand and cement.
    It is heated by gas fire and central heating.
    It is ventilated by air vents, two windows one at each end of room plus two doors.
    There are signs of damp mould in corner but inner wall also shows signs of being corroded by salt.
    We have used a clay based paint.
     
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  3. oilman

    oilman

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    this would be better under painting and decorating.

    You may be able to cure the bubbling problem by changing paint to a clay paint or limewash. Both are permeable and allow moisture to migrate and so the bubbling isn't so likely.
     
  4. Freddie

    Freddie

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    Sounds like damp in your masonary blowing the plaster try the buiding forum
     
  5. tim00

    tim00

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    bryn, you need to supply a lot more detail:
    - solid or suspended floor
    - solid or cavity wall - brick or stone or block?
    - what kind of material do you have on the wall? sand and cement. carlite plaster. other?
    - any heating in room
    - any ventilation in room
    - is there a DPC
    - is there penetrating damp thro wall - what is on the other side of wall?
    - did you have Damp report on occupancy?
    - what kind of paint is on wall
     
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  7. tim00

    tim00

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    bryn, given that you dont want to relay the floor which could be a cause of some of your problems, i'd go for:
    test the walls from floor to ceiling with an electronic moisture meter - establish a pattern.
    Next, the best bet would be to knock off all render to at least 1m high or to ceiling depending on the pattern.
    Re-render in sand and cement and a remedial finish ie. limelite.
    Re-decorate with an advised wash - advice from experts.
    This re-rendering will last for another 30years.
    Dont use any "new" "wonderful" "amazing" chemicals they will only poison you and create further problems. Inject nothing in your walls and stay away from the "electro-osmosis" scam.
     
  8. oilman

    oilman

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    I would have thought a lime render would be better..............?
     
  9. tim00

    tim00

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    oilman, you're quite right, a little lime mixed with the S&C will help it to breathe, or even a lime and sand mix. But iv'e had trouble in the past from people who demanded cement in the mix. Anyhow, thanks for the correction.
     
  10. oilman

    oilman

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    Wasn't meant to sound like a correction, oops.
     
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