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Sealing sink on oak worktop issues...

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by robodelfy, 14 Dec 2020.

  1. robodelfy

    robodelfy

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    Hi

    I have just installed my IKEA kitchen with oak veneered worktops. They come pre oiled, but I only just read you are meant to oil them more once installed.

    I put in my sink with a bead of silicon around the endge and then tightened the sink clips to squash it, and then cut the silicon back after.

    I've just noticed after a couple of months some black marks alojbg the grain where water has been sitting. I think it's partly just the wettest part, but also where the silicon isn't perfect and water has been able to sit.

    Did I make a mistake with the silicon? Should I have just put a bead in and used my finger or profiling tool, rather than cut it back?

    What would be the best course of action now? Should I loosen the sink, and try and get off all the silicon? Then maybe sand down around the sink so the silicon will stick to the wood, as it probably won't stick to an oiled surface will it?

    Any advice would be great 20201214_114955.jpg IMG-20201214-WA0005.jpeg
     
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  3. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    Yes you should have used you finger or the profiling tool and is why water has got behind it.

    Otherwise what you have done is correct.
     
  4. opps

    opps

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    Ideally, the worktop would have had 3 or 4 more coats of oil before you siliconed the sink.

    I don't know how thick the veneer is. You might want to check with Ikea before you sand it back.
     
  5. robodelfy

    robodelfy

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    Yeah I bought some oil, I thought it was pre finished but its only got a light coat on

    But silicon won't stick to oiled wood, thats the issue. I will need to probably sand back very carefully the area where the sink sits on the worktop
     
  6. opps

    opps

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    Silicone will stick to the likes of danish oil (when cured). Which oil do you have?
     
  7. robodelfy

    robodelfy

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    I got the Ikea oil and I think it said Linseed and Tung oil
     
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  9. opps

    opps

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    That should be fine. It dries slowly but it does eventually dry.

    If you wanted to use something like olive oil then the silicone wouldn't stick.
     
  10. robodelfy

    robodelfy

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    I kind of thought oil was oil and they all would be difficult to stick to, thats what I read elsewhere?
     
  11. opps

    opps

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    Seriously, ignore what you had previously read elsewhere. The oil you currently have will accept silicone a day or two after you last apply it (assuming normal drying conditions).
     
  12. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    The oils used as furniture finishes are designed to cure. Some oils, like polymerised tung oil, boiled linseed oil, etc cure naturally in air. Other oils like commercial Danish oil are mixed with additives such as terebene dryers to ensure that they cure. Cooking oils, mineral oils, etc are generally unsuitable for furniture finishing because they don't cure and some can become rancid to boot.
     
    Last edited: 27 Dec 2020
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  13. you need to also get the sink out and seal all around the end grain where the sink hole has been cut out.
     
  14. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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