Shelf brackets over instead of under the shelf - Safe?

Joined
9 Jun 2008
Messages
124
Reaction score
0
Location
Europe
Country
United Kingdom
I want to attach a high up shelf along a corridor, approx 2m across, into a brick wall. I'll likely use some 3/4" ply and 3 or 4 wall brackets. Ideally I'd like to have the brackets mounted internally so that they will be hidden when looking up. I'm always a little worried about mounting shelves this way though, as I presume the strength/holding power of the brackets isn't as good as it would be if they were routed outside, below the shelf?

Could some knowledgable people let me know if what I'm planning is safe enough? The weight the shelf will hold is uncertain, but it's intended as a storage type shelf, dvds, storage boxes etc. It's depth will be no more than 400mm. Any alternative fixing solutions, which still provide a clean appearance would be welcome too.

Any advice much appreciated.
 
Last edited:
Sponsored Links
Joined
30 Sep 2011
Messages
8,951
Reaction score
2,056
Location
Lancashire
Country
United Kingdom
I assume that you want to fix the brackets to the shelves by screwing through the top surfaces. If so, because your screw length is limited to about 20mm, and most brackets have only three screw holes, the load that the shelves can take will be extremely limited due to the risk of the screws pulling out.

Google something like "top hung shelves" to see alternatives. There are quite a few of them out there
 
Joined
24 Apr 2008
Messages
1,543
Reaction score
282
Location
UK, Wittering, West Sussex
Country
United Kingdom
can you use a floating type fixing ?
is the shelf going to be thick enough and the wall able to take that kind of fixing - not plaster board etc

We have a floating shelf in the kitchen with cookbooks on - we did not want brackets underneath - and that has worked really well .
 
Joined
9 Jun 2008
Messages
124
Reaction score
0
Location
Europe
Country
United Kingdom
@JobAndKnock Thanks a lot for the reply. That's very much what I was thinking. I'm not seeing any top hung solutions tho that wouldn't involve some sort of protrusion below the shelf? I really want a clean underneath.

Say I chose a thicker ply or made it thicker using a construction with thick beams to screw into, what sort of thickness would be suitable to screw into enough?
 
Sponsored Links
Joined
3 Nov 2006
Messages
26,943
Reaction score
2,901
Location
Bedfordshire
Country
United Kingdom
I would use countersunk bolts and nuts, The head of the bolt under the shelf and the nut above the hole in the bracket.
 
Joined
30 Sep 2011
Messages
8,951
Reaction score
2,056
Location
Lancashire
Country
United Kingdom
From the depths of my memory I recall there being a library shelf end bracket from Spur. Looked it up and they are still made in widths of up to 470mm.
 
Joined
22 Jul 2016
Messages
5,227
Reaction score
888
Country
United Kingdom
There is a shelf system that clamps the shelf edge where it meets the wall. No idea of strength
 
Joined
16 Jun 2006
Messages
6,640
Reaction score
1,228
Location
London
Country
United Kingdom
can you use a floating type fixing ?
is the shelf going to be thick enough and the wall able to take that kind of fixing - not plaster board etc

We have a floating shelf in the kitchen with cookbooks on - we did not want brackets underneath - and that has worked really well .

I too would recommend a floating fixing but I am not sure that the min shelf thickness is


The OP will have no visible fixings.
 
Joined
30 Sep 2011
Messages
8,951
Reaction score
2,056
Location
Lancashire
Country
United Kingdom
I too would recommend a floating fixing but I am not sure that the min shelf thickness is
Generally about 30mm

There is a shelf system that clamps the shelf edge where it meets the wall. No idea of strength
They are dependent on having a good, flat wall to fix them to. They work better with shallow shelves up to 200/250mm wide - on wider shelves they can droop or even pull out if loaded too heavily. We had them in our last house but one
 
Last edited:
Joined
30 Jun 2008
Messages
14,885
Reaction score
1,574
Location
Suffolk
Country
United Kingdom
If it's going between two end walls I'd batten out the two ends and along the back wall for support. 400mm, (16"), is quite a wide projection for top hanging brackets that will need to hold an unknown weight. The battens can be painted to blend in with the surrounding walls and I'd rather be safe than sorry if it came crashing down on someone.
 
Joined
9 Jun 2008
Messages
124
Reaction score
0
Location
Europe
Country
United Kingdom
Thanks so much for all the replies everyone. Using nuts and bolts is a good idea and the cliffhanger slot bracket looks good but isn't available in the UK. Plus it's expensive!

@conny Why I didn't think of going the batten route though, I have no idea! That's absolutely the best way to go I think. Along with say, 2 brackets along the length to provide additional strength and sagging. Maybe securing them with nuts and bolts too.
 
Last edited:

DIYnot Local

Staff member

If you need to find a tradesperson to get your job done, please try our local search below, or if you are doing it yourself you can find suppliers local to you.

Select the supplier or trade you require, enter your location to begin your search.


Are you a trade or supplier? You can create your listing free at DIYnot Local

 
Sponsored Links
Top