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Snapped Bolt Thread in Cast Iron Housing

Discussion in 'General DIY' started by zappastix, 25 Oct 2021.

  1. zappastix

    zappastix

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    Didn't work. Says image to big. I don't know if that means file size or photo size.
    I'll try reducing size first.

    PLEASE NOTE: I've had to reduce size. Couldn't find out what was required,
    so I've had to convert to .gif - not sure because it's gif that to view whole image
    you have to use side bar to scroll.

    I only mention that because the first and others have the important bit (the bolt) hidden unless scrolled.
     
    Last edited: 28 Oct 2021
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  3. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    Put on another image site and post a link here...
     
  4. mrrusty

    mrrusty

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    If you can't get it out - and don't risk cracking the cast iron, another solution is to drill right through and then open the hole out a little on the outside to a wedge shape. Take a shanked bolt that is a snug fit. Cut the head off and wack it to spread the shaft a bit, so it's a jam fit in the wedge hole. Once pulled tight with a nut on the inside, if you flush off the surface and paint/stain it black, you'll never see it.
     
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  5. zappastix

    zappastix

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    Attached Files:

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  6. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    There is enough of the stud left sticking out, to partially screw a nut on then to weld it and try to unscrew it. Just poke the welding rod into the end of the stud/ through the nut. I see some welding has already been done to the casting.
     
  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    If you do decide to drill it, be sure to use a left-handed drill. And if at all possible, use a drill stand and clamp the part. A snapped drill will make it even harder.

    This is one of the few occasions when a copper grease would be useful on assembly.
     
  8. lostinthelight

    lostinthelight

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    May be easier with better penetration to weld a washer on first then a bigger nut to the washer.
    Unless you are spotting something I cant , the pattern above the the stud looks like the residue from stove rope?
    Op, a picture of the whole stove would be good
     
    Last edited: 28 Oct 2021
  9. conny

    conny

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    If you manage to weld anything to the end, (a nut, a short length of bar etc), you may find the heat generated to make the weld will actually free up the original bolt.
     
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  11. sxturbo

    sxturbo

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    Knock the head off and drill it out, use. Plenty of lubricant and a carbide drill.

    Then use a slightly larger drill bit to drill out the thread, tap it and insert a helicoil. Insta new bolt with high temp grease on the threads
     
  12. Harry Bloomfield

    Harry Bloomfield

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    Correct, that is what I said above. I'm not convinced a washer would be a good idea - a nut limits the weld to the hole in the nut and the stub of thread.
     
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  13. mrrusty

    mrrusty

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    Its all very well having ideas for welders, helicoils, taps and left hand drills, but these are not the sort of things the average DIYer has to hand, and TBH if I wanted to find those things I'm not sure I would know where to turn to locally to me, apart from left hand bits which you can buy fairly easily.

    I am fairly sure if I tried to weld that with my little MIG, the cast iron would just heatsink the heat away and I'd be left with a bit of birdpoo sitting on the surface.
     
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  14. JohnD

    JohnD

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    I agree.
     
  15. zappastix

    zappastix

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    To wrap this up.

    Many thanks to all that have offered help - I'll try what I can from all the recommended ways to do this,
    over the weekend.

    You really would think this manufacture would use steel bolts/screws such as you'd find on say a car engine.

    Built to eventually fail I suppose!

    I still don't know how I eventually got the images I posted - POSTED!
    It was a nightmare. A number kept failing without a detailed reason,
    that is why some of the images doubled up.

    PLEASE SEE BELOW - I have thanked all, because your time and help has been much appreciated.

    So without further ado - Many thanks to;

    *******************************************************************************************************************************
    Randomgrinch
    *******************************************************************************************************************************
    Harry Bloomfield: there is enough of the stud left sticking out, to partially screw a nut on then to weld it and try to unscrew it. Just poke the welding...
    Wrap something like cotton wool around the thread, then soak it with the oil and give it time to work.

    Me: I've never welded, after my Dad was trying to weld new floors on whatever British rust bucket car we had at the time, and he nearly
    blinded himself in the early 1970's, injuries were really bad. I haven't got any welding gear. I never knew that about WD40.

    Going to Toolstation Saturday for some penetrating oil, good reviews for Action Can RP-90 Penetrating Oil, and use the tip about

    cotton wool. Or use Plus-Gas as JohnD suggested.

    *******************************************************************************************************************************

    lostinthelight: Getting a drill straight on is crucial and you need to drill accurately in the centre with a view to retap if it doesn’t come out. Once you get a


    hole right through the stud you can get penetrating fluid down it so it can work from other end of the thread . As already suggested with a


    left hand bit is sometimes useful. *** Unless you are spotting something I cant , the pattern above the stud looks like the residue from


    stove rope?


    Me: Well spotted. Since then I've removed all traces. Still got to glue and fit new rope AFTER I've got these bolts sorted.




    Me: As mentioned above, Toolstation on Saturday, for penetrating fluid and a left hand bit. Interesting about pressure under the head


    caused by whatever its holding down expanding due to rust.




    *******************************************************************************************************************************

    JohnD: if you have to drill it, use a left-handed drill. often the combination of torque, vibration and heat will wind the stud out.



    Me: Blimey, I'm learning a lot here, never heard of a left-handed drill. I'll gather all these things I didn't know about, hopefully

    at least one idea should work.

    *******************************************************************************************************************************

    mrrusty: If you can't get it out - and don't risk cracking the cast iron, another solution is to drill right through and then open the hole out a

    little on the outside to a wedge shape. Take a shanked bolt that is a snug fit. Cut the head off and wack it to spread the shaft a bit,

    so it's a jam fit in the wedge hole. Once pulled tight with a nut on the inside, if you flush off the surface and paint/stain it black,

    you'll never see it.


    Me: Last resort, I would try that - BUT try telling that to my wife!

    *******************************************************************************************************************************

    sxturbo: Knock the head off and drill it out, use. Plenty of lubricant and a carbide drill. Then use a slightly larger drill bit

    to drill out the thread, tap it and insert a helicoil. Install new bolt with high temp grease on the threads


    Me: Yet another lesson - this is the first I've heard of helicoil. Just looked them up. Not sure if they would take the heat.

    Up till now, we have always used manufactured coal, the heat it gives off (Stove rating 600watt) - this year we are

    trying logs for the first time (oppose getting carried away - got to fix it yet, although I feel confident with all the help

    I've received.




    I was thinking I'd have to


    Read more: https://www.diynot.com/diy/threads/...cast-iron-housing.580008/page-2#ixzz7AdzjsOWU




    Well

    - also pick and Screw & Bolt Extractor Set



    , but I'm out on Saturday to get some Plus-Gas










    Toolstation

    Action Can RP-90 Penetrating Oil 500ml

    Action Can RP-90 Penetrating Oil and Screw & Bolt Extractor Set


    Damaged Screw Remover Set
     
  16. zappastix

    zappastix

    Joined:
    2 Oct 2007
    Messages:
    227
    Thanks Received:
    4
    Location:
    Sussex
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    To wrap this up.

    Many thanks to all that have offered help - I'll try what I can from all the recommended ways to do this,
    over the weekend.

    You really would think this manufacture would use steel bolts/screws such as you'd find on say a car engine.

    Built to eventually fail I suppose!

    I still don't know how I eventually got the images I posted - POSTED!
    It was a nightmare. A number kept failing without a detailed reason,
    that is why some of the images doubled up.

    PLEASE SEE BELOW - I have thanked all, because your time and help has been much appreciated.

    So without further ado - Many thanks to;


    Many thanks to;

    Randomgrinch

    *******************************************************************************************************************************
    Harry Bloomfield: there is enough of the stud left sticking out, to partially screw a nut on then to weld it and try to unscrew it. Just poke the welding...
    Wrap something like cotton wool around the thread, then soak it with the oil and give it time to work.

    Me: I've never welded, after my Dad was trying to weld new floors on whatever British rust bucket car we had at the time,
    and he nearly blinded himself in the early 1970's, injuries were really bad. I haven't got any welding gear. I never knew that about WD40.
    Going to Toolstation Saturday for some penetrating oil, good reviews for Action Can RP-90 Penetrating Oil, and use the tip about
    cotton wool. Or use Plus-Gas as JohnD suggested.

    *******************************************************************************************************************************
    lostinthelight: Getting a drill straight on is crucial and you need to drill accurately in the centre with a view to retap if it doesn’t come out. Once you get a
    hole right through the stud you can get penetrating fluid down it so it can work from other end of the thread . As already suggested with a
    left hand bit is sometimes useful. *** Unless you are spotting something I cant , the pattern above the stud looks like the residue from
    stove rope?

    Me: Well spotted. Since then I've removed all traces. Still got to glue and fit new rope AFTER I've got these bolts sorted.

    Me: As mentioned above, Toolstation on Saturday, for penetrating fluid and a left hand bit. Interesting about pressure under the head
    caused by whatever its holding down expanding due to rust.
    *******************************************************************************************************************************
    JohnD: if you have to drill it, use a left-handed drill. often the combination of torque, vibration and heat will wind the stud out.

    Me: Blimey, I'm learning a lot here, never heard of a left-handed drill. I'll gather all these things I didn't know about, hopefully
    at least one idea should work.
    *******************************************************************************************************************************
    mrrusty: If you can't get it out - and don't risk cracking the cast iron, another solution is to drill right through and then open the hole out a
    little on the outside to a wedge shape. Take a shanked bolt that is a snug fit. Cut the head off and wack it to spread the shaft a bit,
    so it's a jam fit in the wedge hole. Once pulled tight with a nut on the inside, if you flush off the surface and paint/stain it black,
    you'll never see it.

    Me: Last resort, I would try that - BUT try telling that to my wife!
    *******************************************************************************************************************************
    sxturbo: Knock the head off and drill it out, use. Plenty of lubricant and a carbide drill. Then use a slightly larger drill bit
    to drill out the thread, tap it and insert a helicoil. Install new bolt with high temp grease on the threads

    Me: Yet another lesson - this is the first I've heard of helicoil. Just looked them up. Not sure if they would take the heat.
    Up till now, we have always used manufactured coal, the heat it gives off (Stove rating 600 watt) - this year we are
    trying logs for the first time (oppose getting carried away - got to fix it yet, although I feel confident with all the help
    I've received.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  17. Burnerman

    Burnerman

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    Zappa, can you get near to the stub with a pistol drill......if not, is it possible for you to dismantle the stove at all to provide access?
    Personally and based on my own experience I would forget about penetrating oil (oxidisation would be total in this situation) left hand drills and stud extractors which need accurate drilling anyway......you need to drill this stub out using a quality HSS bit or similar and the trick is to centre punch the exact centre of the stud and get in there with a new 4mm bit. Any chance of that?
    John :)
     
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