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Soil pipe fittings - WC move

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Bon, 24 Mar 2020.

  1. Bon

    Bon

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    Good morning all,

    I'm looking to move my cloakroom (downstairs) WC. The intended location is 90 degrees in rotation and about 1m in pipe length from the current soil pipe pop-up through the slab.

    The previous WC position was sat directly above the pop-up and a long flexible pan connector was used to connect the pop-up into the rear of the WC and that was pushed into a short length of 110mm soil pipe that is connected to the below ground (orange) pipework and is sitting approx 10mm proud of the slab level but annoyingly hasn't been cut square with the floor slab.

    My original intention was to fit a soil pipe adapter (like a McApline DC1), then fit a spigot bend into it to get horizontal, run the pipework to a second bend to get the 90-degree rotation, then a final short run and use the flexible connector onto the back of the WC.

    That however was before I saw that the original plumber has used a piece of 110mm to get above the floor slab.

    So, my question is do I;

    1 - Stick with the above (I'm just concerned at the height the adapter plus bend will create onto the horizontal run)
    2 - Try to cut back the soil pipe so it sits below the slab and reduces the height
    3 - Cut out the slab around the pipe and use a double socket bend to connect onto it
    4 - Something else

    All comments appreciated!!!

    Thanks
     
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  3. Hugh Jaleak

    Hugh Jaleak

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    Dont try and reuse the existing pan connector, it will leak. Secondly, rigid pan connectors are far superior to flexis, I'd try and use a rigid connector wherever possible.

    Given the fact you're looking to use 2 bends, I'd be getting as much fall as you can, ideally 1:40 to allow the flow to carry around the bends, so personally I think I'd be trying to chisel out the floor enough to get a bend directly onto the spigot.
     
  4. Bon

    Bon

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    Cheers pal. I’m looking at the Terrain catalogue and from what I can work out there’s 51mm of insertion depth for a socket. Does that sound right to you??
     
  5. Hugh Jaleak

    Hugh Jaleak

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    That's about normal, dont think there is much difference between manufacturers.
     
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  7. cjcoffin

    cjcoffin

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    We had almost exactly this situation in summer 2018.

    From the 110 spigot coming up through the screed I used a 110 access elbow to start the horizontal run, then about 1m run to the pan connector with another elbow in it. Using the dimensioned drawings in the Osma catalogue I satisfied myself there was enough overall fall, and it has not given any trouble in 18 months daily use.

    If I am understanding your setup correctly the short stub pipe goes into a below-ground socket, if you can get this out and replace with a slightly longer square-cut bit then I think this would work well (combination of your 3. and 4.) without too much excavation.
     
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  8. Bon

    Bon

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    Thanks. Going to have a proper look this weekend as I can’t tell if it’s been solvent welded to the below ground or if it’s been cast in with the slab. I’m guessing the latter so I’ll see if it will turn at all first
     
  9. Hugh Jaleak

    Hugh Jaleak

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    Unlikely to have been solvent welded below ground, you need flexible joints in drains to absorb any slight movement.
     
  10. Bon

    Bon

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    Got it done today. There was no budging the 110 pipe that was popping up so if it wasn’t solvent welded then the slab had really got hold of it!!

    Managed to get it cut square & chamfered and broke enough of the floor slab out to get a socket bend onto it.

    Just need to get the rest of the decorating done and the flooring in before I can finish it.

    Cheers for the advice guys, much appreciated.
     
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  11. DIYnot Local

    DIYnot Local

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