Solid Oak Floor onto Original Pine Floorboards

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In short -
- Do I need to sandwich anything between the two floors?
- How do I make the floor look straight if the room isn't square?

The Details-
I am just about to attempt my first solid oak floor installation.

The wood has been delivered, and is acclimatising to the room until next weekend. It is Solid Oak, Lacquered, 130mm wide and has come in various lengths, between 1300mm and 500mm (the majority being in the shorter sizes). I have 12m to lay, in a room 3m x 4m.

My plan is to nail it across the existing floor using a porta nailer through the tongue.

I have taken the skirting boards up in order to hide a 10mm expansion gap after the floor is down.

Thanks for your help in advance.
 
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Oh dear, another 'short end of the stick' floor.

If your existing floorboards are level you can nail the new floor straight onto it - no need for extra underlayment - that will only be crushed where you nail.

I highly recommend you leave wider expansion gaps than your 10mm. Rule of thumb with solid Oak flooring 3mm gap per meter width of the room, minimum of 10mm. Knowing it's Winter with lower air-humidity I suggest you leave at least 15mm gaps around.
 
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Thanks for your advice, and will adjust my expansion gap as you have recommended.

I am actually fairly happy with the mix of lengths I have got. I think it could have been worse.

I have just had a count up from the first 6 packs I opened (I have a spare pack for overs):

26 x 500mm
36 x 650mm
16 x 700mm
8 x 750mm
24 x 800mm
8 x 850mm
16 x 900mm
6 x 1300mm

I hope these lengths will allow a decent look for what was a very good price. I also have the spare pack to raid for the longer pieces if I feel the need.

The room is a dining room, so I will endeavour to put the more "hectic" areas under the table.
 
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I am actually fairly happy with the mix of lengths I have got. I think it could have been worse.....

The room is a dining room, so I will endeavour to put the more "hectic" areas under the table.
It could have been worse indeed, not a bad mix all in all, and good idea re your dining table.
 
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I would say, go with the flow of the room. Even if that means having to cut off bits on boards running along the two longest walls. It'll be easier on the eye.
 
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Hi....I have laid a fair amount of this type of flooring on old boards. The advice thus far posted is good all I would add is:-
1. Run the boards away from the entrance door into the room if possible and if this means they are 90% to the original so much the better.
2.The mix of sizes is typical of flooring at circa £20 a metre from Selco for example and will look cool especially if laid running away from the door.
3.You might experience splitting of the tounge when using the nailer. I have found drilling a pilot hole and hand nailing is equally effective and safer.
4.If you have any doubhts with areas over pipework you will be ok to PVA glue the occassional run of boards.
5.Keep the missis of it with her high heels :D
 
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Thanks for the tips.

I will be running away from the door, as this is thankfully a right angles to the existing boards.

Is it best to start laying in a corner, or rather against one wall to avoid having to cut along the length of a board at both walls?
 
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Start with full boards along one wall using offcut to start next row (unless it less than say300mm).
Secure the edge of the board running along the wall with screws into the floor boards with the screws positioned such that they will be covered when you replace the skirtings.

It is a straight forward job...the challenge will be when you reach the final wall and the irregular walls that you have mentioned show themselves. Do not be tempted to 'open' the joints to take out irregularity's.

An old timer once said to me 'two wrongs don't make a right'....wish I had a fiver for each time that as proved to be the case.
 
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Start with full boards along one wall using offcut to start next row (unless it less than say300mm).
If none of your walls are straight to start with lay the first row as close as possible to the most straight wall, making sure the joins between the boards are closed (which means your row is straight). Place various size spacers between the first row and the wall to make sure the row stays straight and doesn't move when you install the next rows. When you finished the whole floor fill in the remainder between first row and wall. That's the 'fiddly' bit of it.

As for 'going with the flow': like aspley suggested, take the view from the door as starting point of the room. If you step in the room and the floorboards look straight from there on you've gone with the flow of the room no matter how uneven your long walls are.
 

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