Solid oak insurance nightmare

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I had a solid oak floor that was the result of an insurance claim following a bad leak (whole downstairs flooded). The incompetents that installed it did so by gluing to self leveling compound, but without drying the concrete underneath. The floor warped, cupped, buckled and generally became a mess very quickly. After a year of nasty letters and legal threats it was finally ripped up and a drying company brought it.

Anyway, assuming I'll be left with a dry concrete subfloor soon, I'm trying to work out what my best options are as really don't want the same to happen again.

Should I specify a floating solid wood floor, with DPM underneath or should I just go for engineered wood and save all the hassle? Are floating solid wood installations strong enough along the T&G. Or, do I just let them self level over the dry concrete and hope for the best (which I was assured was fine the first time, and seems to be what they'll do again unless I intervene).

Would be very grateful for any advice as I really don't trust these 'experts' that the insurance company is forcing on me.

Thanks,

Nick
 
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With self-leveling compound the weakest link is still the bonding between compound and concrete floor. Is that not done correctly than glueing solid or wood-engineered boards is not recommended.

You could install a proper wood-engineered floor (much more stable in many circumstances than solid floors and because of the solid top layer of 3.6mm up to 6mm you still have the appearance of a solid floor) floating on combi-underlayment, making sure all T&G's are glued correctly.
 
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if the floor is damp you will have problems wether it engineered or solid. The simple thing to do is not fit the floor untill the subfloor is dry enough, have your so called professionals taken a moister reading of the concrete? It needs to be below 65% RH (relative humidity) If they have not taken the moister reading then dont let them fit the floor! The test takes 24hrs minimum to get the correct reading!
 
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Thanks guys,

The drying company is making sure the concrete is sufficiently dry, and the old layer of self leveling compound has been taken up. Part of the concrete has bitumen on, from where Marley tiles used to be.

What I'm trying to find out is if glued down to concrete (or self leveling compound) solid wood installations are very prone to problems, even on concrete that's officially dry enough? Are floating floors a 'safer' option?

@WoodYouLike - Thanks for the tip. Is oak wood-engineered flooring available that gives the appearance of oak planks .. our previously floor looked like...

http://www.floors2go.co.uk/buy-onli...593/1828/?&search_term=&type_id=&suitability=

Which was visually great, until it started going wrong.
 
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solid and engineered look the same when fitted, most people can not tell the difference. As for glue down this is the most common method. In the u,k our standard we work to does not recommend floating, "woodyoulike" works to there recommened method which is from abroad, this is fine if this is the method they use in there home country, They also guarranty there work and dont have problems using this method. Bit like france drive on the right hand side of the road and they say this is correct and us in the u.k drive on the left and we say this is correct! What ever method you decide is upto you.
There is equal amout of risk in either method, both will fail if not done correct and both will work if done correct. The main reason floors fail is incorrect moister in the subfloor.

Make sure you ask what the relative moister content of your subfloor before fitting, it MUST be below 65% other wise the flooring will fail!

P.s we do float engineered in the u.k. And i would always recommened engineered as they are alot more stable with moister change, basically you can get away with alot more if things are not quite correct.
 
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Floors-2-go are about to go ;) (under that is, trying to sell the whole company to the highest bidder - if there are any).

We, as quality small retailer can never compete on price with these 'pile them high, sell them low' companies. We can and will compete on quality ;)
 
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