Stripping wallpaper issue

I

imamartian

I've just started to strip off the wallpaper in my front room. The problem is that it seems the paper is stuck better to the paint underneath, than the paint is to the plasterboard.

So in most places, the scraper is quite easily fetching off paper and paint, however in certain places the paing is well stuck to the plasterboard, and i'm fetching off the top layer of the plasterboard brown paper, leaving quite a rough finish compared to the top layer of plasterboard.

The question is, if i wanted a painted finish, would i need to skim the rough brown paper, or would an undercoat of paint work? or if i wanted a papered finish, am i ok just to paper over this?
Do i need to PVA in any case?

Ta all.
 
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Zinnser do a product called Gardz which is specially designed for fixing drywall, it also binds and seals the wallpaper paste. So apply it, fill damaged areas, rub the whole wall down, spot prime the filler and you should be ready for whatever finish you want
 
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PVA the damage, Easy-fill, sand with a BLOCK, spot prime, sand lightly and emulsion.

If it doesn't work you'd better leave.

BTW, it sounds like the plasterboard has been fitted in reverse.
 
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Had exactly the same problem last week in our bedroom. The paper on the outside walls stripped fine and left the old paint behind but the internal stud walls hadn't been plastered so stripping the wallpaper brought most of the paint off but at the plasterboard joins where the pb had had a skim of plaster over the join, the paint stuck to the plaster.

I ended up with a dreadful patchwork looking walls and was contemplating papering the walls to get a decent finish.

After a lot of thought amd digging with a scraper I decided to sand the walls down to a reasonable surface using an electric sander and 40 grit paper then 120 grit so it took most of the old emulsion off the main pb, but still left it on the joins. After doing this the walls still looked really bad with dents and dings all over them so I then gave them two coat of Dulux emulsion with the intention of spot filling the obvious damage and sanding those bits down by hand with 120 grit on a block after painting.

And I have to say it worked marvellously.

Two walls are "good enough" without the spot filling, the other two have needed some filling and I'll sand them back and re-emulsion tomorrow.

I would add that often things aren't quite as bad as they look and a couple of coats of paint can transform things dramatically.


So to sum up, give your walls a sand using a machine; a couple of coats of emulsion and then decide from there. What have you got to lose? Half a day and a £15 tin of paint?
 
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I

imamartian

Had exactly the same problem last week in our bedroom. The paper on the outside walls stripped fine and left the old paint behind but the internal stud walls hadn't been plastered so stripping the wallpaper brought most of the paint off but at the plasterboard joins where the pb had had a skim of plaster over the join, the paint stuck to the plaster.

I ended up with a dreadful patchwork looking walls and was contemplating papering the walls to get a decent finish.

After a lot of thought amd digging with a scraper I decided to sand the walls down to a reasonable surface using an electric sander and 40 grit paper then 120 grit so it took most of the old emulsion off the main pb, but still left it on the joins. After doing this the walls still looked really bad with dents and dings all over them so I then gave them two coat of Dulux emulsion with the intention of spot filling the obvious damage and sanding those bits down by hand with 120 grit on a block after painting.

And I have to say it worked marvellously.

Two walls are "good enough" without the spot filling, the other two have needed some filling and I'll sand them back and re-emulsion tomorrow.

I would add that often things aren't quite as bad as they look and a couple of coats of paint can transform things dramatically.


So to sum up, give your walls a sand using a machine; a couple of coats of emulsion and then decide from there. What have you got to lose? Half a day and a £15 tin of paint?

thanks for that. however my worry/problem is sanding brown paper.. surely i need tp solidify the paper first before i sand anything? and sanding plasterboard is not gonna work is it? or are you using the paint to give you a base?
 
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The problem you have is one that's difficult to sort. In the trade we'd just re-skim it and that would defo sort it.


Those really shallow flaky paint problems are really too shallow for most fillers.


For that type of stuff I use car body filler (easy sanding type). it's less that £20 for a big tin in Halfords. Lasts for years without going off in the tin and fills everything and anything - no matter how shallow.

You fill the paint scars then in about 20 mins you use a sanding block and get perfect results.

I shouldn't tell you this as I'll get kicked out of the trade secret association.

:LOL:
 
I

imamartian

Ta Joe.

I realise my error now... the paper and paint was all coming off together far too easily, and when it can to a small patch where the paint had stuck, i was scraping off the top layer of the plasterboard. What i should've done is wet the paper. On the last bit i did that and it comes off easy.


For the rough brown paper bits i tried in places using plaster skim, and this helps a bit. But i'm thinking maybe lining paper over the lot?

two questions though

1. how to seal the rough brown paper? Size? PVA? Emulsion? or just whack on the lining paper?

2. can lining paper be put on horizontally? and if so, can i put up a 7metre piece in one go?
 
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It's often a good idea to whack on a couple of thinned coats of emulsion to seal everything then use something like easy-fill and sand with 120 grit and a block.

Not a fan of lining paper - it looks like painted wallpaper.
 

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