Strongest fixing - Resin vs Expanding Bolt

Discussion in 'Building' started by emphasis303, 16 Dec 2014.

  1. emphasis303

    emphasis303

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    Hello everyone,

    In regards to fixings what fixing can hold up the most weight, Resin with stud or expanding bolts?

    Many thanks
     
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  3. Norcon

    Norcon

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    Neither and wouldn't take the gift of either.
    Thunderbolts are the strongest and fastest. Plus they are easily removed.
    They are the closest you will get to reinforcing cast in concrete.
    We use them for high tonnage pulls on formwork. Have yet to see a failure.

    If you don't want them removing then resin them in and buff the heads round.
    My supplier was telling me the other day its not easy convincing the ole timers.
    So they still stock a few expanders.
     
  4. jeds

    jeds

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    Load bearing fixings are rated for a safe working load across a range of situations. Given the same material background a 3kN expanding bolt is better than a 2kN resin bolt - or a 2kN thunderbolt come to that. My advice is select a bolt that is appropriate for the load and the material you are fixing to.
     
  5. Norcon

    Norcon

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    Rawlplugs M12 expansive bolts are only rated for a 18.5kn ultimate load tensile pull. For my job that means failure.

    Where as the M12 thunderbolt ultimate load rating is 52kn.
    That says it all for me. Nearly three times more powerful.

    So if you want to use the rawl expansive bolt then upsize to M20 to match the M12 thunderbolt and buy yourself some heavy drilling equipment. (ie - 20mm for the fixing material and 32mm for the masonry)

    Fischer M12 resin is 50kn. Hilti goes a bit higher at 57kn.
    Assuming the glue holds. :rolleyes:
     
  6. wakey77

    wakey77

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    Are thunder bolts suitable for fixing timber to brickwork
     
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  8. Norcon

    Norcon

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    Yes they are.
     
  9. noseall

    noseall

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    ...and so is a plug and screw.
    What is it you are trying to do?
    Bear in mind also that some bricks are hollow or frogged.
     
  10. emphasis303

    emphasis303

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    Thanks for your replies, so thunderbolts,http://www.tradefixdirect.com/nails-screws-fixings/fixings/anchor-bolts/thunderbolts/thunderbolts-hexagon-head-galvanised these things will provide a better fixing than resin?

    Just found a chimney stack 300mm wide in the bedroom that is cut off just above floorboards, nothing supporting it, the stack has been cut off in the adjacent room and gallows in the loft, planning to install 2 gallows on this 300mm at the same level as the existing gallows.

    I know SE! But its like the size of a ruler and theres at least double the amount of brickwork below then there is above the roof.

    Bricks are in good condition, 6mm thick gallows and 5mm plate up against brickwork with 2:6 mortar bed. Type c1 from gallowbrackets.com


    Always used resin and studs for serious fixing, was going to install m12 stud 85mm in to solid brickwork, stack is alredy rendered and looking solid, no issues with party wall. Stack is built into the party wall and is double leaf solid. Have seen thunderbolts but im not so interested in the tensile strength of the bolts was going to get grade 8.8 from local fixing supplier, more interested in actual grit of the fixing, bricks are only what 7kn compressive, i know different force all together! The bricks would fail before the fixings, should have explained fully from the start apologies!

    Crap phone keyboard hence text talk!
     
  11. JohnD

    JohnD

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    In most cases you will not need a fixing that has to withstand a pull-out load. But it is important not to use a fixing that will start a crack or burst in e.g. brickwork, so an expanding bolt may not be favourite.
     
  12. emphasis303

    emphasis303

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    Ok so I had a thought, drill 150mm, meaning into the second leaf, screw in thunderbolt, job
    done?

    Cheers
     
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