Stupid customer your opinions please

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Hi all

I was asked by a customer to install a tv booster splitter in there loft. The customer supplied the booster which seemed a cheap make. I installed it in the loft and supplied it via a fused spur from the smoke detector circuit. Due to the lighting loop being wired at the switches.

Sent the invoice and all was well (it does also state on my invoice that I provide no warranty for faulty parts supplied by the customer)

I have been back today to install a CCTV camera for the customer.

I turn up to be told by the customer that the tv booster failed and they have brought and installed a new one. I stated that I don't offer any warranty on parts supplied by them as stated on my invoice. Customer just said its fine he sorted it.

So when I was up in the loft I noticed that he has removed the spur I installed and fitted a old metal clad socket to the plastic back box and plugged the booster in. Then just dumped it on top of the insulation. I had put a wooden board on the beam and screwed the other booster to that.

Sorry for the long winded post but just wanted your opinions on what I should do?

Do I just ignore the customers rough work and the fact the is now a socket on the lighting circuit ?

Or do I re install the spur and spend some time putting it back together.

Or tell the customer that his work needs rectifying ?

I have tested it and filled out the certificate for the work.

How would you deal with this ? suggestions welcome

Cheers
G.T.S
 
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I would advice the customer that you have seen that he has altered the original work, and that now the warranty on the entire installation is void and will require being put back to how it was to be valid again, which will incurr labour costs. If he doesnt want that then get him to return your original invoice/receipt.
 
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Put in to him in an email so that you have record of what you have said and when it was sent.

Andy
 
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I have tested it and filled out the certificate for the work.
Is this the work you did or after the work the customer did?
If the latter you should have documented this on the certificate.
If it was for work before the customer amended it, just send a polite note detailing the work you had seen and keep a copy for your records.
 
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I am not an electrician in any shape or form. I am a Company Director of my own Ltd Company and deal with all sorts of customers on all levels with strict Terms and Conditions/Disclaimers in place.

I personally would write down everything. Every small listed detail and put it on Company headed paper with highlighted parts of your Terms etc. I would not allow this customers emotions or reactions or your own to get in the way of your work and the way you work.

Just grit your teeth, dig your heals in and show him you are in charge of this situation.
 
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A socket on lighting circuit? You'll have to assume that other appliances can be used with this DIY socket then it can overload the wiring on the lighting circuit regardless if it is protected by a over current device! I would insist this is to be put right before I even test and certificate!
 
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A socket on lighting circuit? You'll have to assume that other appliances can be used with this DIY socket then it can overload the wiring on the lighting circuit regardless if it is protected by a over current device! I would insist this is to be put right before I even test and certificate!

You can fit a socket on a lighting circuit. If there is a suitable overload device on the circuit, and the circuit does become overloaded, then the protective device, providing it is suitable and working will cut the supply before damage is done.
 
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A socket on lighting circuit? You'll have to assume that other appliances can be used with this DIY socket then it can overload the wiring on the lighting circuit regardless if it is protected by a over current device! I would insist this is to be put right before I even test and certificate!

So, what's that 6A MCB for? Show?
 
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A socket on lighting circuit? You'll have to assume that other appliances can be used with this DIY socket then it can overload the wiring on the lighting circuit regardless if it is protected by a over current device! I would insist this is to be put right before I even test and certificate!

So, what's that 6A MCB for? Show?

Probably thinks an overload device is for short circuits only or something! :rolleyes:
 
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Thanks for the replys guys

The test certificate was filled out the day that I carried out the work for my work.
I put on the certificate that it was to install a new fused spur from an existing circuit .

I think I will email him stating that his alterations arnt up to standard and that it needs to be rectified back to how I installed it.
 
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I have tested it and filled out the certificate for the work.
Is this the work you did or after the work the customer did?
That was my first thought.

Assuming the paperwork is for the original installation, then leave it at that. You aren't responsible for what the customer does to the installation after you've driven off. From the description, it sounds like "not good workmanship" but not dangerous. Many professional installers wouldn't do any better :rolleyes:

Just note what you've seen, in a form that can be relied upon later should you need to. Ie, if the customer kicks up a fuss and (say) trading standards call round - you can turn round and show that the customer has porked about with it since you did the original work.
 
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Yes i would do that, sounds like a plan. Only thing you need to do is record your findings so that in future (if he decides not to rectify it) that there isnt a fault or accident caused by it and the liability falls onto you.
 
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Just leave it. It's not dangerous. The work you did was fine and they chose to change it. That's up to them. Kicking up a fuss is going to achieve nothing apart from losing you a customer.
 
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It's his house let him do what he wants. Your paperwork covers work you did so you shouldn't do any remedial unless he pays you. It's disheartening when a customer changes their mind and you have to undo/re do work but as long as they are paying for your time then there's no issue.
Worst part for you is he's been and changed your work (for the worse) which is a potential confidence knocker but he's had you back so he's happy with you. As other posters have said keep taking the cheques and doing the work getting arsey won't achieve anything.
 

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