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Tall windows problem.

Discussion in 'Windows and Doors' started by overide, 23 Aug 2004.

  1. overide

    overide

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    Hi all,

    I'm a newbie to the forum and this is my first post so please forgiv me if this is in the wrong forum, but I hope someone can help!

    I've just moved into a converted old school. The 1st floor has been added at time of conversion but we have gothic style windows all the way up one side of the building crossing the first floor.

    Where the windows cross the floor there is a large gap at each window (there are three). I'd like to fill these gaps and sound proof somehow as you can here everything downstairs when you are in the bedroom upstairs and vice versa, but I'm a bit stumped at the moment.

    There are a few pictures here to explain what I mean.

    http://imagehost.darkernet.co.uk/i/DSCF0001.JPG

    http://imagehost.darkernet.co.uk/i/DSCF0002.JPG

    http://imagehost.darkernet.co.uk/i/DSCF0003.JPG

    http://imagehost.darkernet.co.uk/i/DSCF0004.JPG

    http://imagehost.darkernet.co.uk/i/DSCF0005.JPG

    Thanks in advance.

    Richard
     
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  3. TexMex

    TexMex

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    Doubt I'll be able to help much but could you post the pictures somewhere that is publicly accessible. Suggest you look at www.imagehost.darkernet.co.uk
     
  4. overide

    overide

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    Thanks, images fixed.
     
  5. loftus75

    loftus75

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    I can see this is a very difficult problem. However, you might try fitting a second double glazed window on the second floor, from floor to ceiling.
    That is, fit it so that it is actually fitted to the second level floor and extends up as far as the ceiling and creates a seal between the second level walls and window and walls......I'm not sure that's completely clear, but I hope you get my drift.
    This way you'd be able to maintain the light from the window while reducing sound between the floors. Of course the D/G window would have to work so that access to the original window was available.
     
  6. overide

    overide

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    Hi Loftus75,

    That's a possibility I haven't thought of. I would like to keep the original windows in so this would work. The only problem I see is that the current windows are church style shaped arches at the top, so it might be difficult getting a secondary double glazed window to fit and look right.

    I was more thinking about building something in the gap and filling it with somekind of sound proofing, although I'm not quite sure about how to do it.

    Thanks for your suggestion, I will definately look into it as an option.

    Cheers

    Richard
     
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  8. TexMex

    TexMex

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    I think loftus idea of the secondary glazing is well worth considering. The tricky part (pointy bit), needn't be opening. The framework in this area could simply be made from MDF. For a more substantial frame, where the glazing could be hinged, timber would be better. If you get the levels to match, you could make the whole thing seemless, by means of a bit of decorative routering to finish.

    Perhaps you could make a piece of furniture with the back, tailor made to fit into the gap. Say a bookcase, a bench, TV stand or Potted plant holder.

    The biggest problem I can see with your idea of filling the gaps is fixings. It looks like, whatever you put there, would become an extention to the floor, (inviting someone to stand on it). What type of structure is the floor/ceiling?
     
  9. ninebob

    ninebob

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    I would cut two panels of MDF to fit the gap between the edge of the floor and the window. At lounge ceiling level mount a panel to the underside of battens fixed to the window sides, then go upstairs and fill with foam to floor level, then mount the other panel to the top of some further battens. Paint the MDF to match the wall or carpet, whichever you prefer. Then, to stop anyone treading that close to the window I would fit a small decorative balustrade (about 8" high) at the edge of the real floor. Job done!
     
  10. big-all

    big-all

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    i was thinking along the lines of nine bob

    but i was thinking glass as in maybee blocks or two sheets of glass
    as somthing solid would not be sympathetic with the window
    if you did use glass as a floor you would have to protect it
    or make it structural

    big all
     
  11. overide

    overide

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    Thanks guys, some great replies. Has given me lots to think about.

    The floor btw, is chipboard laid across the beams.

    Cheers

    Rich
     
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