Testing new Radiators for leaks prior to Boiler installation.

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Originally we had a back boiler which has been ripped out and a wood burning stove installed in its place. The system was full of black sludge.

I have, Replaced all of the radiators with new including TRVs.
Flushed out the copper pipes of the system prior to the connection of the new rads.

The new boiler has not yet been fitted as I am not yet decided as to what combi to have installed?

I now want to fill the system up with mains pressure water to test for leaks.
If I pressure the system up and there are any leaks the first thing that will escape will be air so I assume soap solution is as good a system as any to test for leaks on joints and rad connections?

However if water does get into the rads this could cause rust?

Is it better to fill and bleed the rads, leaving the water in, as once air enters will this not accelerate rusting?

Any advice on testing rads?
 
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if no water in it pressurize the system with an air compressor with a guage and leave to settle for a while and see if you have a drop.
 
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Thanks, I have no access to such a compressor only one of those 12v car tyre compressors.
When I attach the hose to the Flow pipe with everything closed water pressure initially caused air pressure in the un-bled system to rise.
The joints can then be tested with soap solution as you would with gas?

I guess my question is, If I fill the rads and exclude air will this reduce the risk of them rusting whilst waiting for the system to be completed?
 
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Well, for plastic pipe installation you air test from 1.5x the working pressure, up to 18bar (for older type pipe & fittings) :eek:

Screenshot_20180905-070415.jpg
 
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Thanks, I have no access to such a compressor only one of those 12v car tyre compressors.
When I attach the hose to the Flow pipe with everything closed water pressure initially caused air pressure in the un-bled system to rise.
The joints can then be tested with soap solution as you would with gas?

I guess my question is, If I fill the rads and exclude air will this reduce the risk of them rusting whilst waiting for the system to be completed?

FYI... Gas joints are not bubble tested with soap solution they're tested with LDF. Soaps contain oils and other chemicals that could attack various materials in different joints.

If I were you, I'd fill the whole lot (including rads) with water (bleeding all air out) to about 2.5bar, stick a gauge on it and seal it off and then monitor the gauge over the coming days/weeks/months.
 
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If you're worried about rusting rads then add 100ml of inhibitor to each one before filling.
 
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The new boiler has not yet been fitted as I am not yet decided as to what combi to have installed?

An Intergas ECO RF is always a great choice ;)

I now want to fill the system up with mains pressure water to test for leaks.
If I pressure the system up and there are any leaks the first thing that will escape will be air so I assume soap solution is as good a system as any to test for leaks on joints and rad connections?

However if water does get into the rads this could cause rust?

Soapy water will certainly cause rust - washing up liquid is actually quite corrosive long-term. Why not just fill and test the pipework, and leave the rads empty? Brand new rads are highly unlikely to leak, and in the event that they do they'll be easy to spot and sort out
 

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