Three storey house, kitchen move from middle to ground floor.

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Hi All

I have a quick question on planning permission/regulations regarding a kitchen move. I have a three storey house where the kitchen is located on the front, middle floor. I want to move this to the back, ground floor. This is something that several of my neighbours have already had done. The question arises over the permissions and regulations. My neighbours are unaware of any planning applications made for the works but they used competent professionals (as viewed in the eyes of the law) to complete the move. The relevant certificates were completed by the tradespeople.

I spoke with my local council who told me to make a planning application. I'm confused as I was under the impression that the job falls under permitted development but requires sign-off on certain aspects, i.e. electrical and drainage. This is supported by the above. I've also done a search for previous planning applications but come up blank.

I have no problem making an application but I want to check whether it is needed and under what circumstances, i.e. if I bring in a plumber and electrician, can they sign-off and issue a certificate for their work and negate the need? I'm not trying to skirt around the regulations or avoid a planning application. I want to have all my bases covered; the correct paperwork is in place, the right professionals are used, and I'm not missing anything. Currently, I'm looking to complete the bulk of the work myself, bringing in a contractor for the electrical installation. While I'm not a professional, I am more than capable of managing the project and completing the rest of the kitchen install to a high standard. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
 
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It's not permitted development, planning regulations do not apply.

You need building regulation approval, and be sure you understand the fire safety requirements.
 
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As most kitchens are sited on the ground floor, close to an easy exit route, I'd have thought that's not going to be too difficult? Easier than satisfying safety requirements on the first floor.
 
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For sure, until the OP drops that old gem that they wants it all open plan.
 
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Open plan? You must be kidding.

The room we want to use is similar in size to what we have now but has access to a conservatory, in addition to the internal door that leads in from the hallway. Fire safety is a huge concern, obviously. The only advice the council building control have given so far is stairway integrity must be maintained. We have no plans to alter access but do hope to run the grey water pipe via the cavity beneath the stairs (under-stairs cupboard), to the drain access. There is already mains water running to an outside tap, routed this way.

I'll double check what it is I am filing with the council. It's probably me getting 'planning' and 'regulation approval' confused. Thanks for the correction though, I was misinformed about permitted development. Of those neighbours I asked, most said it fell under it. The same builders have done most of the conversions in the area - it makes me wonder if all the correct applications were made.

In short, the answer is; regardless of who I use, or if I complete the work, I need building regulation approval. Electrical will be covered by a contractor and the rest of the work verified by my local building control. I have plans already drawn up detailing the kitchen remodel, proposed drainage and electrical work. To their credit, they did say I could start the build as soon as the paperwork was filed, just that they would need access to any work already completed when they inspect. i.e. no blocking/boxing off access.

Regarding the old kitchen, I'm under the impression that once the gas is disconnected I can convert this, in our case, to a bedroom. No further applications are needed? Obviously the gas will be disconnected and made safe by a competent professional. If this were to be done at the meter level, i.e. be completely disconnected from the grid and no longer have the capability to use gas, would we still need a gas safe engineer to remove the boiler and hob? Or could we disconnect it and pull out the gas lines? FYI, we're looking to go 100% electric with added solar and a heat pump.
 
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I have plans already drawn up detailing the kitchen remodel, proposed drainage and electrical work.
If these were drawn up by a kitchen supply/fitting firm, make sure that they understand and are aware of the fire safety implication as this wont be just a standard kitchen refurb.
 
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Thanks for the advice. As far as I'm aware, they're drawn up with this in mind. Obviously, we're flexible if things need changing and we'll listen to what the local building control say. Our need is driven by practicality over any aesthetic proclivities.
 

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