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Transplant established rose bush

Discussion in 'In the Garden' started by Ouch77, 21 Feb 2021.

  1. Ouch77

    Ouch77

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    Hi all,

    We have some impending building work and there's a well established rose in exactly the wrong place. Photo here is from last year, ros is now near top of trellis: 20200223_150737.jpg As far as I can tell (google streetview is brill) the rose has been in this location for at least 15 years, and has grown quite tall before being cut back on various occasions, so I imagine it's pretty well entrenched.

    We want to move it, it's bloom and fragrance is far too nice.

    What's the best approach to transplating such a plant?
    When should I do it (building work is planned for the summer).
    Can I put it in a large planter for the duration of the work and then re-plant it when it's done?
     
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  3. Some roses aren't too keen on being moved but they can be.

    ideally if pruning is required, it should have been done in late October. So if the rose is suitable for pruning and needs it, I'd do it in lateish March. Then you need to pot it up and keep it somewhere frost free.

    When you replant it, ensure that it's not planted where a rose has been grown before.
     
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  4. endecotp

    endecotp

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    I would move it now, while it’s somewhat dormant. Put it in a planter or dig a hole elsewhere in the garden. Prune it very hard first.
     
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  5. Needs to check it's suitable for pruning, some ramblers won't recover from it.
     
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  7. Ouch77

    Ouch77

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    It's had multiple prunings in the past, and seems none the worse for it.
     
  8. Ouch77

    Ouch77

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    How big a planter would I need? What would a hard pruning consist of? - my gardening abilities so far consist of trimming a hedge and mowing a lawn -this is kinda new to me.
     
  9. Ouch77

    Ouch77

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    FYI
    This is the state it's in as of yesterday..
     

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  10. endecotp

    endecotp

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    See how much root you get when you dig it up, and use a planter big enough for that; I suspect that due to the concrete you will struggle to remove a lot.

    Do you not have a space in the garden where you can dig a hole for it?

    I would chop everything a couple of feet from the ground.

    See also:
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=293

    My own experience moving roses has been plants that had not established well in their original location; they had not much root, explaining why they were not doing well! They are happier now they are moved. Your plant looks happy there so it probably has good roots.

    The main purpose of pruning in this case is because of the inevitable root damage. If the roots are, say, halved then the plant will only be able to support half as much foliage without dehydrating.
     
  11. DIYnot Local

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