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Tube light problem

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Homesafe, 12 Apr 2014.

  1. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Oh, cynical.

    C'mon John, think of the planet.
    Throwing away perfectly good starters when unnecessary is a total waste of resources and contributing to polar bears drowning.

    :)
     
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  3. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Who said anything about throwing then away? - they could be sold on ebay :)

    Seriously, though, although it obviously is not good for the planet, we live in a world in which a 'throw-away'/'disposable' culture is often the financially 'sensible' option (apart for those who benefit by things not being thrown away!), particularly for a commercial organisation (which exists to make profit).

    It sometimes goes further than just replacing the (working) starter at the same time as a tube. I have seen and heard of situations (particularly when access to the fitting is less than straightforward) when currently working tubes (and their starters) in the same fitting are 'routinely' replaced at the time a faulty tubes is replaced.

    In any event, causing an electrician to make additional calls not only has financial implications (for both electrician and customer) but also has some detrimental effects on the polar bears - so none of this is simple!

    Kind Regards, John
     
  4. ericmark

    ericmark

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    I have to hold up my hands and say I made an error when swapping a tube at home I selected a thin one instead of a fat one and they worked but not for long and just like talked about here the ends went black as it started to fail.

    When I looked for fat tubes I had a problem finding them in the end found stocked in wickes. I took the old tube with me for two reasons one to ensure correct replacement and to so it could be disposed of correctly as I was sure retail outlets not have to accept lamps with mercury for recycle however wickes would not take them.

    I have always intended to get a HF fitting but as yet not got around to it.
     
  5. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    I used to have lots of 'fat' (T12) tubes but have gradually replaced them all with 'thin' (T8 ) ones over the years without any problems. It seems hard to believe that the difference between 65W and 58W is going to have any significant consequences.

    Are you sure that the short life of your tube was anything to do with it being 'thin'?

    Kind Regards, John
     
  6. 333rocky333

    333rocky333

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    Ive only witnessed problems striking with what i know as "Ballast fittings" starterless units.
    With "choke" fittings fitted with starters I dont recall ever having problems.

    This was apparently well publicised when T8 tubes first came out
     
  7. 333rocky333

    333rocky333

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    Most tubes sold now have a life of at least a year so it makes sense, and in my opinion if changed together, I would still expect the new starter to fail prior to the new tube.
     
  8. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    That fits with my experience. All of my fittings were/are choke+starter and, as I said, I've had absolutely no problems (of starting or tube life) since gradually replacing all the aged T12s with T8s (as they died,over a period of years).

    I suspect eric may just have been unlucky.

    Kind Regards, John
     
  9. 333rocky333

    333rocky333

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    I was on a job last week and there was Two unopened boxes of 5ft T12 tubes in the skip.

    50 tubes, like gold dust to someone who still needs them.
     
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  11. ericmark

    ericmark

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    I had a stock of thin tubes so it was simple to just fit one. They did work but only for 6 months to year and the fatter tube is more like 5 years.

    I know I fitted my landing light with a second hand florescent fitting in 1994 and had to replace the 18W tube last year so around 18 years and second hand to start with. Bought it in a radio club bring and buy.

    OK will admit the 18W fitting had the original ballast replaced with an electronic unit which also has battery back-up so likely HF but to me lasting a year is premature failure I expect a tube in a domestic to have at least a 5 year life.
     
  12. 333rocky333

    333rocky333

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    IMO, the old halophosphor T8 never lasted like the halophosphor T12,

    It wernt till Triphosphor T8 came out, that lamps tended to last a reasonable time, but 3 times the cost and recomended to use with Electronic starters to reduce lamp maintenance, to one yearly relamp intervals, polylux tubes boasted a two year life.

    Apparently the non fitting of the PFC capacitor across the input terminals which became popular around the 90's didnt help the lamp life but have no factual evidenc why, or if true
     
  13. Homesafe

    Homesafe

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    I'm going to change the full fitting Today.
    Hopefully that cures this stupid issue.
    Thanks for all the comments.
     
  14. winston1

    winston1

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    Not having PFC won't help lamp life, but it won't reduce it either.
     
  15. winston1

    winston1

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    Most tubes sold now have a life of at least a year so it makes sense, and in my opinion if changed together, I would still expect the new starter to fail prior to the new tube.[/quote]

    What? Starters normally outlive tubes by a factor of 5 or so.
     
  16. Lectrician

    Lectrician

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    I will continue to swap lamps and starters together. For the cost, it's a no brainer, and while tubes should not be left in and on while faulty, they usually are.

    Everyone I know swaps them together. Anyone not, IMO, is not doing their job correctly. Doesn't look good if you have to return a few weeks later as the same fitting is out again.
     
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  17. bernardgreen

    bernardgreen

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    The PF capacitor is also a part of the circuit that puts the back EMF voltage spike from the inductive ballast across the tube when the starter opens. Without the capacitor the spike has to pass through the mains wiring making the voltage spike across the tube smaller and less likely to strike the tube first time the starter opens. Poor starting shortens tube life.
     
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