Undercloak overhang on roof is short (or non-existent)

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Coopa (thanks for a very detailed reply to my pp !) identified (amongst other things) lack of proper
undercloak overhang on my roof). Regs apparently say overhang should be 50-60mm.
His suggestion to repair that part of the roof was: lift 1m of roof tiles all the way up the roof,
fix new battens to the rafters, add new felt/membrane over the top & replace tiles. This means the
run of tiles will now have a shortfall of approx 50-60mm going down the (length/drop/face?) of the roof.
Adding an extra row of tiles will create too big an overhang & will likely catch the wind etc.
So if the 'gap' isn't wide enough for a 'column' of new tiles. .... What do people do in practice ?
If the tiles are cut, that will look uneven, going right up the roof. Mine can't be the only situation where
the undercloak should be extended, so someone somewhere will know what should be done ! Hope I've explained this so that it can be (relatively) easily understood ! and many TIA.
 
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Thanks, Woody. Thought that might have to be the answer: will make the tiles on roof look uneven.... though nobody other than
an expert will notice .... just wondered if there was any alternative. Follow-up question: best to cut the tiles that sit 'one-in',
rather than the end tiles ?? Again, tia
 
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Yes if these are traditional tiles (ie not concrete interlocking) then you would make use of "tile and a half" tiles at the verge and cut these, and have any cut less than a full tile as the next tile in, not on the edge.

Interlocking tiles can just be cut at the verge.

Could you, or would you want to, fit a dry verge or a continuous dry verge system? That would do away with under cloak.
 
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I am unbelievably grateful that you go to so much effort with suggestions for a stranger ! I think a dry verge could be
fitted & if that solves the issue of raising/cutting tiles, that will be a massive saving in time & effort & fits in with a quote
I received, but which I was a bit uneasy about - as PP (previous posters) had said a wet verge is better etc & that bits of dry verges (being plastic) may come adrift over time .... I'll sleep on it till Monday. Mega thanks for all advice so far: am incredibly grateful for the reassurance & time you have taken on this !
 
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Wet verges are aesthetically better, but the problem is finding someone good enough to do the verge properly ... despite it being a standard thing for a roofer. Your added problem is the overhang, but again that should not be a difficult thing for someone who knows what they are doing.

Back to dry verges. These come in two flavours individual pieces for interlocking tiles, and continuous for all tiles and slates. I don't ever specify the individual types as they look crap and tend to randomly fall or get blown off. I prefer the continuous type, but sometimes these may not look right on older properties.

Do a Google search on the types and see if one or the other may be appropriate.

Or post a photo of the gable and get some opinion.
 
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Tx Woody ! 4 photos (A-D) (shows bargeboards w/o the ply - taken off to see state of timber underneath). On left of Photo A is my roof. Scaffold is outside NDN's. Had a roller-coaster morning with a roofer today, who said: ..... barge board is rotten and best replace with UPVC. This wd mean remove all leading. Nothing to be done to the overcloak. £2-2,500 approx. Dry verge not needed. If I want a dry verge & want battens extended, he'd only be lifting 2 tiles (so not a metre, maybe 35cm) and would extend battens from there. He was very sceptical about the need for an undercloak overhang. Not able to give an estimate of cost as it depends on condition of roof once he's got the tiles up. And not interested in the job unless I replace BB with PVC, which in his professional view, is the best route.
BUT the BB timber is NOT rotten, though it may give that impression (as the paint on it IS flaking).
Back to your email: I said my undercloak overhang is minimal; Photo C of NDN house shows his overhang is also minimal. Photo B shows NDN's bargeboards (same as mine & unpainted=neglected over last 20 years, but no evidence of leaking/water patches affecting his house).
But mine has leading (an added benefit) nearly to the bottom of the verge and today's roofer said the leading was in vgc. The mortar on the 'wet verge' of mine also looks in vgc to my untrained eye, i.e. solid & no cracks).
Seems to me that the problem lies in the lower part of the BB, which is not covered by leading. In 2019, a
roofer covered it with ply, which after 2 years, rotted (not surprisingly, as it was the wrong stuff to use).
You suggested I google 'continual verge'. Klober has a nice simple YouTube clip & I think it looks smart. The roofer this morning wasn't interested in putting in a dry verge, continuous or otherwise.
Photo D shows end gable of the 4 houses, in case anyone can recommend a particular dry verge system that suits style, etc.
Following Coopa's post, I moved the satellite cable, so am hopeful it wont be a conduit for rain in future. As he said, this is a small job in the scheme of things, but does seem to have its complications and I'm extremely grateful for your's (& others') help in ironing them out. Very grateful for any views on what type of continuous dry verge to instal.
 

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