Velux with Sandtoft 20/20 tiles-should they slant like this?

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Hi all,

I’m a long time reader but first time poster so please bear with me.

I would be very grateful if the roofers amongst you had a moment to cast your expert eyes over the new roof on our extension. To date we’ve been very pleased with the job our builder has done for us but we are slightly disappointed with elements of the roof - please see these photographs (also located in my photo album):

http://media.diynot.com/208000_207855_65973_20330173_thumb.jpg
http://media.diynot.com/208000_207855_65974_59274466_thumb.jpg
http://media.diynot.com/208000_207855_65972_73046122_thumb.jpg
http://media.diynot.com/208000_207855_65970_95199626_thumb.jpg
http://media.diynot.com/208000_207855_65971_47336522_thumb.jpg

The original quote included the deep profile concrete tiles but our builder was very helpful in providing a selection of alternative tiles as we were keen to use a modern product that was nearer in appearance to the original main slate roof. In the end we opted for Sandtoft 20/20 tiles and the builder supplied Keylite windows (980x780) with Keylite flashing kits.

From reading similar threads on this site I am aware that some uplift of the tiles adjacent to the windows is to be expected but we feel ours is perhaps excessive. As so often happens, since the fitting of our roof everywhere we look we seem to be spotting velux-type windows on roofs fitted with a variety of tile types but none have uplift anywhere near what we see on our roof.

The tiles immediately above the window (which is also the top row of tiles) also appear to be set at less than the minimum 15 degrees pitch – what impact is this likely to have? (NB: I’m sure our builder still has to complete the pointing on the ridge tiles by the way).

Our concerns have not been helped by a neighbour telling us that their builder who was round sorting their snag list had commented that our roof didn’t look right.

We spoke to our builder when the roof first went on and he assured us that this is correct. If it is then fine because ultimately we want a roof that is water tight but we feel it is a shame that we opted for the more expensive option on aesthetic grounds and have ended up with a roof that in our opinion looks worse than those roofs in the nearby area that have the concrete tiles and virtually no uplift around the velux windows.

Apologises for the length of this question but I wanted to provide the maximum information. We have a very good relationship with our builder so don’t want to wade in telling him we think his work is incorrect (to whatever degree) without first getting some opinions from people in the know.

Thank you in advance.
 
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Yes it is typical.

There are measures to take to avoid kick, but they are a faff and time consuming.
 
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Hi, after looking closely at the pictures the raise in the tiles does seem excessive, this could just be because the Velux's are so close together causing the dip in the middle to look more prominent. What I would of done personally is to use a 3/4 inch lat instead of an inch lat to fix the windows onto. This would of lowered them slightly and insured that the flashing kit did not push them up further.

If you have a good relationship with your builder I was just voice your concerns to him. I am sure that he look into reducing the lift if is concerning you.
 
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It makes no difference what thickness the tile battens are. The side flashing trays sit upon the battens in the same plane as the velux.
 
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Thank you noseall and mathewhunt for your quick replies.

Could I clarify what you think about the top row of tiles, particularly those above the velux? I guess it is the uplift on to the flashing that again is at play here in producing a shallower angle than the rest of the roof but could this lead to issues, either immediately or in the future?

One other point I would be grateful to clarify is this: is it normal for the fascia board on a pitched roof to slope gently away along the length of the extension? You can see this by following the top brick course and fascia in the side view photo that the fascia (and therefore possibly the roof as well?) is sloping down gradually along the length of the roof. Is this normal practise?

Thanks for your ongoing assistance.
 
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One other point I would be grateful to clarify is this: is it normal for the fascia board on a pitched roof to slope gently away along the length of the extension? You can see this by following the top brick course and fascia in the side view photo that the fascia (and therefore possibly the roof as well?) is sloping down gradually along the length of the roof. Is this normal practise?

Thanks for your ongoing assistance.
We have just built a large extension whereby the existing building is on the squint so our own brickwork has had to slope very slightly so that we 'course in' both ends where our extension joins the existing building at both ends.
There are feature courses in both the existing and in the extension that meant that keeping in course was critical.

This has meant that there is a slight fall.

We decided to keep the fascia dead level and allow the soffit board to take up any deviation. The soffit slopes up very slightly at one end and slopes down very slightly at the other.

Ho hum no one can see.
 
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Getting the tiles to sit better around the windows is quite simple
The velux side waterbar should have been tapped over ,lowering the height of the bar combined with removing the tile nib if it is in line with the waterbar.
It looks like the top flashing of the window will cover any discrepancies in the pitch and I would think the roof is watertight.
 

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