Was all of these isolators necessary?

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House is being rewired.

And the electrician has placed the isolators for the kitchen appliances (fan, washing machine, fridge, hob, oven etc) in a cupboard wall unit.

I am just curious whether all of these isolators were necessary?

For example do you one need an isolator for a fridge? And isn't the hob and oven usually on one isolator?

Is this how modern rewiring is done? Or is the electrician simply trying to up his number of points?
 

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Not required at all.

And should never have been fitted in the cupboard, nevermind to the fabric of the cupboard itself.

Did you not agree with him the scope of works before he began?
 
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And if they were 'necessary' they would have looked more 'aesthetically pleasing' by being in 2 x groups of 3 rather than having that odd one stuck at the top like an afterthought.
 
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I am not an electrician.

In you current set up you can isolate each device.

Personally, I don't see what the problem is.

Edit... but yeah, use a label printer- I am a decorator but I have a proper label printer...
 
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Looks almost as good as mine
 

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House is being rewired.

And the electrician has placed the isolators for the kitchen appliances (fan, washing machine, fridge, hob, oven etc) in a cupboard wall unit.

I am just curious whether all of these isolators were necessary?

For example do you one need an isolator for a fridge? And isn't the hob and oven usually on one isolator?

Is this how modern rewiring is done? Or is the electrician simply trying to up his number of points?
Absolutely nothing wrong with design (except the labelling is a bit shoddy).

You can isolate each appliance if and when you should need to.

It would be a poor design if you couldn't.

Putting them in the cupboard avoids a row of switches on show on your kitchen wall.

Why do you think there could be a problem with the switches?
 
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Not required at all either by the regs or common sense. Appliances can be isolated by pulling their plugs. You also have two fuses in line ( in the FCU and the plug). Get a fault and both could blow.
 
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Appliances can be isolated by pulling their plugs
Isolation may be delayed if the plug that has to be pulled is behind a washing machine,

Until the faulty appliance is isolated and the RCD can be reset sockets on the circuit will be dead,

Hopefully the FCUs are double pole ( switching both Live and Neutral ) to provide total isolation,
 
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I would have gone for a grid system, a double socket faceplate is 4 modular wide, and a fuse holder and a switch is one modular wide, so likely it could be made more compact.
Appliances can be isolated by pulling their plugs.
This is only true if the appliance uses a plug, which can be accessed, and plug and socket is not permitted as an emergency disconnection device, it can be used to isolate of course, so where there is a need for emergency disconnection for example a washing machine if the weights become loose, which means turning off without touching the washing machine, you need a switch easy accessible to isolate the socket common found behind the washing machine so non accessible.

Clearly these switches should not be where you need to empty a cupboard to reach it.

Also found the hard way, not all freezers can be on the freezer switched off to defrost, and again the socket often obscured by the appliance, so some remote method of switching off seems good.

I think technically unless fitted with wheels, over 18 kg is not classed as portable. Which has caused some problems with the new landlord EICR law, as unless fitted with wheels, an appliance over 18 kg is considered as not normally moved, so is included in the inspection, even when the government guide says its not.

So normally switches like this 1657357909515.png are used, on a plate like this 1657357953494.png above the counter top where there is easy assess.

As a foot note, today washing machines have an auto switch off system for out of balance load, so the need for a switch easy accessed to switch off the machine in the case of an emergency is not as important as it once was. The regulations say "Where in case of danger there is the necessity for immediate interruption of supply, an interrupting device shall be installed in such a way that it can be easily recognised and effectively and rapidly operated."

The FCU is one way, however rather pointless inside a cupboard like that.
 
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My parents had a dishwasher once that caught fire whilst I was at their house. I was rather glad I could easily isolate it imediatley without having to pull the machine out or run off to the consumer unit. In my view isolator switches for big kitchen appliances are a sensible thing to have, but I'd rather have them more accessible than at the back if a cupboard.
 
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A maintenance nightmare, be a right pain in the arse trying to test those too!
 
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Isolation may be delayed if the plug that has to be pulled is behind a washing machine,
Indeed, some remote means of control may be beneficial if the primarily one (e.g. plug/socket) is nor easily accessible (e.g. behind a large appliance: However ...

1... You are talking about emergency switching, not "isolation".

2... Too many people locate such switches/whatever too close to the appliance the are controlling. There's no point in having an 'emergency switch' which one could only get to in an emergency by reaching over an appliance which was 'in flames' or had become 'electrically life'

3... If the appliance is connected via a socket and (fused) plug then, as often said, there is no point/need for the remote switch to be an FCU. However, nor is there any appreciable downside, other than the possible need to (once in a blue moon) replace two blown fuses) - and the primary deciding factor is often that FCUs can be appreciably cheaper than DP switches.

Kind Regards, John
 

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