Waste pipe for new bathroom suite

R

richsmith2005

I've just bought my first house, and four weeks ago was the first time I held a paintbrush, so apologies in advance if my question is very basic. I've searched the forum and elsewhere but have been unable to find an answer to this - probably because I'm using the wrong terminology.

I have a 1910 mid-terrace ex-council house. The bathroom appears to have been added later on and is not part of the original structure. Among other things, we are removing the old bathroom suite and replacing it with a new one. We are on a fairly tight budget and are having to use a plumber for the fitting, however, I was impressed with the price of this suite http://www.plumbworld.co.uk/1608-15882. There is a note 3/4 down the page, notifying that "The toilet connects to the waste pipe through the wall in the standard UK fashion. It is not available in a version that connects to a waste pipe vertically through the floor." When we've looked, it seems that's exactly what we have, a soil/waste pipe that connects vertically to the floor.

What would you suggest as a way round this? Choose a suite that is configure to connect vertically and have a limited choice? Add some sort of T-pipe into the ground, or a snake-type pipe onto the back of the toilet?

Thanks in advance, Richard.
 
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p1071931_l.jpg


;)
 
R

richsmith2005

Are you suggesting I buy a new style toilet designed to be used with the waste pipe going straight out the wall and fit one of these so the waste goes around the bend and out the vertical pipe?

If so, this wouldn't be the ideal solution as it is a very small bathroom and bringing the toilet any further forward (in order to fix this on) wouldn't be practical.
 
N

Newboy

At the risk of being very rude - you asked the question 'how do I connect a pan with a horizontal spigot to a hole in the floor' the answer was given to you by kevplumb

You have three alternatives

1) Buy a pan with a vertical spigot (not many around)
2) Connect the pan with a right angle adapter
3) Alter the stack so that you can have a horizontal spigot going out through the wall
 
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R

richsmith2005

At the risk of being very rude back, I can't see any of those responses from Kev, only a picture of a pipe with a bend in it. But thanks, for what you've since said.

How exactly would I alter the stack so that I can have a horizontal spigot going out through the wall? Like I said, I have absolutely no clue about toilets, I can just about manage sitting on one, but that's it.
 
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Poxy edit is doing my head in :evil: there is a fitting i the catalog that looks like a :?: ...that one brings the pan back ;)
 
R

richsmith2005

So with the new waste pipe fitting, I could experience rubbish water pressure when I flush?

Surely this isn't an extremely rare problem? What do people usually do, install the pipe and put up with it?
 
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richsmith2005 said:
So with the new waste pipe fitting, I could experience rubbish water pressure when I flush?

Surely this isn't an extremely rare problem? What do people usually do, install the pipe and put up with it?
:LOL: ..........er No, ....when you`re as old as me the flow .......That is MY flow...is slow :LOL: :LOL: :LOL: NOT the WC
 
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You mean this sort of thing?
sm_wc-conq.gif

or
sm_wc-con4a.gif


How much "backset" do they actually give?
 
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Nearly all wc's are horizontal outlet nowadays. A bent pan connector like the picture above is what will connect your pan to the hole in the floor. They are push fit and easy to install. They will also have no effect on water pressure what so ever; they are designed to allow the waste to be flushed away with no, or very little, hinderance.

Your only potential problem could be with how far the hole is into the room. If it is too far in, say because the original pan was a low level one, then a new close coupled pan and cistern would be forced into the room too and may need boxing behind. This is generally unattractive. There is a bent pan connector that may help a little. There is a picture of it above, it looks like a question mark. This can help but only with certain designs of pans.

Is your floor solid or wooden??
 
R

richsmith2005

Thanks grrinc, that's exactly what I needed to know. You're right, the hole position is problematic, it's quite far in and would require unattractive boxing added behind.

Unfortunately the floor is concrete.
 
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Oh well. We usually alter wastes if it is a wooden floor. Dont give up yet though, the bathroom merchant who we usually fit for has a few select ranges of close coupled wc's that have the outlet pipe set back far enough to accomadate most holes. The choice is limited and the wc's usually cost a bit more than usual. Pop into a local bathroom design showroom - not a plumbers merchant or shed - and get the designer to show you a few. Most designers are well aware of these problems and will be able to point you in the right direction. You may have to pretend you are buying a whole suite just to get his attention though!
 

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