Water based vs Solvent based?

  • Thread starter Deleted member 137318
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Deleted member 137318

I want to change my newel posts, banisters and spindles from their current dark colour (Sadolin redwood) to white. I'm worried about chips appearing later on so I'm looking for something pretty hard wearing.

I'm thinking that spraying would give better results than hand painting but I'm not sure what paint to buy or how to approach it. I've heard that solvent based paint is easier to apply for a DIYer like me and I'm not bothered by the smell. Should I just hire a compressor and apply a primer, an undercoat and then a topcoat? If so, what's the best paint?

The wood is in excellent condition but the Sadolin is a bit shiny so I'm foreseeing hours of sanding unless there's a really clever primer out there that will just stick to it.

Views or opinions appreciated.
Cheers
 
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I want to change my newel posts, banisters and spindles from their current dark colour (Sadolin redwood) to white. I'm worried about chips appearing later on so I'm looking for something pretty hard wearing.

I'm thinking that spraying would give better results than hand painting but I'm not sure what paint to buy or how to approach it. I've heard that solvent based paint is easier to apply for a DIYer like me and I'm not bothered by the smell. Should I just hire a compressor and apply a primer, an undercoat and then a topcoat? If so, what's the best paint?

The wood is in excellent condition but the Sadolin is a bit shiny so I'm foreseeing hours of sanding unless there's a really clever primer out there that will just stick to it.

Views or opinions appreciated.
Cheers

Spaying with oil based will leave a sticky residue all over the place (due to overspray). If you are going to spray then look at hiring an airless sprayer or HVLP (less overspray). A sheet of cardboard held behind the spindles will help catch much of the overspray. I have done it but only under duress.

Tinted acid cat lacquer will leave you with a fine dust that should be easy enough to clean up but I would not recommend it unless you are willing to use suitable respiration equipment. It has been known to trigger asthma in people that had never previously shown any symptoms.

There are a number of waterbased products, available from people like Morrels, but they ain't cheap.

Some products such as some of the zinnser primers might negate the need for sanding. TBH I would sand anyway.

I can see why you might think that spraying would be faster but don't forget to factor in the time requires for masking/sheeting/gun cleaning.

You also need to take into account yellowing. If the rest of the wood work is finished in an oilbased finish, it might look a bit odd in 5 years if the spindles have been finished in AC or WB, and thus not yellowed.
 
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Deleted member 137318

Thanks for that advice - very useful. The whole hallway is being decorated so I'm not overly fussed about overspray plus, with front and back door open, I'm confident that there will be enough of a through draft to allow me to wear a just gauze mask without giving myself a bad chest. Point well made though Oops, I don't want to hurt myself over this.

I will look into Zinnser primers and tinted acid cat lacquer (I'm assuming they are all oil based products?) and have a crack at it. The last time I sprayed anything was a Ford Escort back in the 80s so I'll start on the landing where runs are less visible :D
 
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Thanks for that advice - very useful. The whole hallway is being decorated so I'm not overly fussed about overspray plus, with front and back door open, I'm confident that there will be enough of a through draft to allow me to wear a just gauze mask without giving myself a bad chest. Point well made though Oops, I don't want to hurt myself over this.

I will look into Zinnser primers and tinted acid cat lacquer (I'm assuming they are all oil based products?) and have a crack at it. The last time I sprayed anything was a Ford Escort back in the 80s so I'll start on the landing where runs are less visible :D

One reflection you might be better off with the appropriate Zinsser primer and then go ahead with oil based finish.

AC paints can "eat" the previous coatings and I doubt that any manufacturer would be willing to give you the green light to spray over someone else's product.

Health risks aside, AC is lovely to work with. It hardens in minutes and if the weather conditions are favourable you can apply a second coat within an hour or two.

Regardless of which paint you use, do yourself a favour and (at a minimum) pick up an AEBK charcoal filtered mask. eg

https://www.redboxsafety.co.uk/abek...zkaRwimS9350xdp-3PNK3C-FJLKIcuMKclhoCY_nw_wcB

Shop around and you will probably find a cheaper one. The filters can be replaced with different filters for sanding etc. I am pretty stupid and have sprayed many times without a mask (sometimes with a fag in my mouth)- I have always regretted it the next day.

With the charcoal filtered mask, you won't even be able to smell the paint.

You will need to thin the (oil based) paint (and some paint dryers, eg Terebene, will aid drying times).

Don't forget that spray paints can be flammable and all that.
 
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