Water In Oil Tank

Discussion in 'Plumbing and Central Heating' started by Mark 9002, 27 Oct 2021.

  1. Mark 9002

    Mark 9002

    Joined:
    10 Jun 2018
    Messages:
    65
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I've Oil central heating. My tank is a plastic 1200 ltr ( semi circular type . Titan I think ) feeding a Firebird Popular 90 in the Garage The tanks the same age as the house I guess. 25 years. I have not been getting any problems at all, but just took an inclination last week to buy some water finding Paste. Smeared some on a stick and stuck it in and it show approx 1/2 inch water detected. Like I say, been having no problems, but what's the best way to get rid of this water. I know that you can get the sock type thingys that absorb the water but they only seem to absorb small amounts. Any advice would be appreciated
     
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

    Joined:
    22 Jul 2016
    Messages:
    4,787
    Thanks Received:
    772
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I know sod all about oil tanks etc.
    But don't oil tanks have some kind of sump/upstand feed pipe so that any water is under the feed for the oil output? It would make sense to me, and possibly some kind of sump drain plug?
     
  4. muggles

    muggles

    Joined:
    28 Oct 2005
    Messages:
    13,439
    Thanks Received:
    3,109
    Location:
    Daventry
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Old steel ones did, and we're usually found to be rusted solid so they couldn't be used. Plastic ones don't have a drain as (at least in theory) there's no way for water to get in.

    @Mark 9002 at 25 years old a plastic tank is likely due for replacement. Single skin ones only come with a 2 year warranty, bunded ones with a 10 year warranty. Whilst removing the water is a good idea, a thorough inspection of the tank is highly recommended to determine how it got there and what condition the tank is in
     
  5. Tigercubrider

    Tigercubrider

    Joined:
    22 Jul 2016
    Messages:
    4,787
    Thanks Received:
    772
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Don’t all tanks suffer condensation?
    Even if no rain water gets in, I would expect moisture to build over time
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. oilhead

    oilhead

    Joined:
    29 Nov 2009
    Messages:
    2,183
    Thanks Received:
    524
    Location:
    Shropshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    With the take off a good 1 1/2 -2 inches above the base, I wouldn't be over concerned after 25 years. Just have a look around the tank particularly at the bends in the moulding, for cracks.
     
  7. Sponsored Links
  8. Mark 9002

    Mark 9002

    Joined:
    10 Jun 2018
    Messages:
    65
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks all for the comments and advice. Didn't realise the take off was a good bit higher, and after 25 years I guess 1/2 inch isn't that much. The tank is still sound. Its actually fitted into a breeze clock surround with a concrete base and no sight or smell of any leaks. I think I'll plan to have it replaced next spring but in the mean time I'll fit a water trap filter with see through plastic bowel that I can drain any water off if it gets through. I guess just before the boiler would be the best place for this. Just a thought on fitting new tanks. Is it a good idea to just have a wee bit of incline away from the take off end ?
     
  9. Stivino

    Stivino

    Joined:
    11 Oct 2006
    Messages:
    3,560
    Thanks Received:
    398
    Location:
    Edinburgh
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I wouldn’t bother as, I would assume that the people who manufacture the tanks will have taken all that into account in the design process.
     
  10. Exedon

    Exedon

    Joined:
    2 Oct 2021
    Messages:
    205
    Thanks Received:
    62
    Location:
    North Notts/South Yorkshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    New bunded tank on a solid level non combustible base that extends 300mm beyond tank. Worth checking all other distances (from boundary hedges fences ect) as tanks were often installed incorrectly.
     
  11. oilhead

    oilhead

    Joined:
    29 Nov 2009
    Messages:
    2,183
    Thanks Received:
    524
    Location:
    Shropshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Good installation of steel tanks always had a 'toe down' away from the take off, with a drain cock at the low end. Condensation is not the same problem on plastic tanks.
     
Loading...

Share This Page