Waterproofing Bathroom Corner from Shower

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The image below shows a plan view of a bathroom with the location of a bath.

The green circles are the locations of an overhead ceiling shower (centre of bath) and a wall-mounted shower.

The lower left corner is an open alcove from floor to ceiling.

There is obviously potential for water to go into this area, so what possible remedies could be used to prevent this?

Obviously the entire alcove could be blocked off, but I'd rather this wasn't done unless there's no alternative. That is, as the bathroom is 1.4m x 1.7m only.

Perhaps (marine?) plywood could be cut to shape to fit in the alcove from the bath lip to maybe a height of 30cm above the bath. Then some combination of tanking liquid product applied or a cement board applied, or waterproof matting, then tiling. What do you think - thanks!

bathroom plan.jpg
 
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Potential?? You can almost guarantee that water will find its way in there. Of course you can alway tank that area and then panel/tile it but what do you do about the water that does find its way in there? It will eventually go stale and smell/mould.
You could always put a horizontal panel it at the height of the bath into the alcove and use it as a shelf to hold all the smelly's etc with an IP65 downlighter above it.
 
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I'm just wondering why you have 2 showers over the bath
The central shower is positioned in the ceiling directly over the bath.

The shower positioned on the wall is a hand shower which can be lifted off the wall when being used.
 
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I watched the film. I think you're suggesting that this could be used to entirely block off the alcove from ceiling to bath/floor.

What about the option of constructing a timber frame of the alcove plan shape, angle the back of it higher than the bath side (by 0.5 - 1.0 cm), apply a sheet of ply, apply a sheet of cement board (eg AquaPanel), then tile?
 
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Of course you can alway tank that area and then panel/tile it but what do you do about the water that does find its way in there?

You mean if tanked/tiled from floor/bath to ceiling? I'd prefer not to do this in any case as it would make the bathroom feel even smaller.


It will eventually go stale and smell/mould.
Good point.

You could always put a horizontal panel it at the height of the bath into the alcove and use it as a shelf to hold all the smelly's etc with an IP65 downlighter above it.
Do you think the wall end of such a "shelf" should be in the region of 0.5 cm - 1.0 cm higher than the front?
 
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sorry, I misunderstood the problem. I was thinking about splashes running down the wall.

It's possible to use that system to run down to a panelled floor in the same system. It looks like a bathroom but has the waterproof properties of a wetroom.

I'd expect it, being purposebuilt, to be less fiddly and more reliable than using a ply and tanking approach.
 
H

Hot&Cold

The image below shows a plan view of a bathroom with the location of a bath.
That size and shape of room would be ideal as a wet room :idea:

Your bath is going to be less that 1.4m in length,it may suit your needs but personally i would at this early planning stage alter all the plumbing and have the bath on the adjacent 1700 wall.

You could have a bath tub made to measure to fit into the alcove,although the bespoke route can be expensive but it would enhance the room and be more suitable.

Good luck:)
 
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Good point from @Old&Bold, how tall are you? A 1400mm bath if going to be pretty small and if you're anything above 5'2" then you'll find it pretty difficult to lie in.
 
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Your bath is going to be less that 1.4m in length,it may suit your needs but personally i would at this early planning stage alter all the plumbing and have the bath on the adjacent 1700 wall.

Much of the 1700 wall is in fact a window (I should have indicated that on the plan).

Also, I want to get a short projection toilet and a slim basin in there as well. With a 1700 bath, unfortunately, there wouldn't be the space.
 
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That size and shape of room would be ideal as a wet room :idea:

If I kept the 1400 bath (same location as plan), what has to be done differently to the room to make it a wet room?

I was intending to lay marine ply on the floor. Cement board on the stud walls.

In addition to this, would I apply (for example) Homelux floor matting over the ply floor before tiling, and Homelux wall matting over the cement wall board before tiling?

I believe the overlapping of matting gives even greater protection than the simple butted together cement board.
 

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