1. Visiting from the US? Why not try DIYnot.US instead? Click here to continue to DIYnot.US.
    Dismiss Notice

What are these things in between bricks?

Discussion in 'Building' started by HComplex, 12 Oct 2021.

  1. HComplex

    HComplex

    Joined:
    11 Oct 2021
    Messages:
    1
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I'm trying to work out these rectangular bits are between bricks at various places around my house. There are a couple visible around windows (possibly due to mortar falling off around it?) but there's also one visible on the edge of the wall that the garage door sits inside.

    Either way, they're all very lose and could be pulled out with no effort. They look like wood but feel extremely light and have lots of tiny holes in them.

    I'm mostly asking out of curiosity but also thinking I should be taking the ones by the windows out and sealing the gaps to prevent water getting in?
     

    Attached Files:

    • 1.png
      1.png
      File size:
      449.8 KB
      Views:
      203
  2. Sponsored Links
  3. noseall

    noseall

    Joined:
    2 Feb 2006
    Messages:
    43,455
    Thanks Received:
    2,685
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    In t' olden days before we had such things as drill, joint sized wooden packers were built into openings jamb brick joints to allow timber frames to be nailed into. There is inevitable shrinkage and they do loosen once fixings have been removed.
     
  4. ^woody^

    ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    33,999
    Thanks Received:
    4,615
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Tell me more of these olden days of which you speak. o_O
     
  5. stuart45

    stuart45

    Joined:
    13 Sep 2008
    Messages:
    3,145
    Thanks Received:
    488
    Location:
    Somerset
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I can remember putting them in partition walls. You would get a clout round the ear for getting the grain the wrong way.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. noseall

    noseall

    Joined:
    2 Feb 2006
    Messages:
    43,455
    Thanks Received:
    2,685
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Tin baths were not only used to wash the father of the house (the rest of the family could have second dibs with the same water) but it doubled up as a plasterers mixing tub.

    Doors and windows were made of wood and were painted in colours other than white or grey.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  7. ^woody^

    ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    33,999
    Thanks Received:
    4,615
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Dad, mom the kids then the dog. Apparently.

    I remember our street with all the different coloured soffits/fascia and barge boards as well as doors and windows. Orange was a thing IIRC.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. JohnD

    JohnD

    Joined:
    15 Nov 2005
    Messages:
    74,225
    Thanks Received:
    4,287
    Location:
    Crossgates, Europe
    Country:
    Cook Islands
    What's that?

    Eh?

    Pardon?
     
  9. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    6,440
    Thanks Received:
    1,400
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I'm surprised that I didn't come out grey after a bath - being the youngest I got in just before the dog. It used to take about 2 to 3 hours to heat the water in the copper which was built into the corner of the kitchen
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Sponsored Links
  11. ^woody^

    ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    33,999
    Thanks Received:
    4,615
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Oh, the good 'ole days
     
  12. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

    Joined:
    30 Sep 2011
    Messages:
    6,440
    Thanks Received:
    1,400
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Not really. Wiping the condensation off the windows every morning in winter (poor insulation, no central heating), having to clean out the grate every morning in autumn and winter (coal fires, "pocket money" chore), etc. Some things are better these days
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. conny

    conny

    Joined:
    30 Jun 2008
    Messages:
    14,128
    Thanks Received:
    798
    Location:
    Suffolk
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    From a family of 7 plus 4 cousins, plus mum, dad and aunty all in a 3 bed Victorian terrace with an attic.
    Dad was always first in the tin bath and had total privacy and the cleanest, hottest water. Then it worked it's way down the ranks from eldest to youngest. I was next to youngest so me and my little sister shared the final water. The good part was we never had to help to carry it out into the backyard to be tipped out.

    In the winter we didn't have the luxury of wiping the condensation off the windows. We had to scrape the ice off instead.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. ^woody^

    ^woody^

    Joined:
    3 Sep 2006
    Messages:
    33,999
    Thanks Received:
    4,615
    Location:
    West Mids
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yes, but those swirly frost patterns were really something weren't they!

    Yes I do remember the time when the fire downstairs was the only source of heat apart from the cooker. We're all too soft nowadays.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. DIYedboy

    DIYedboy

    Joined:
    14 Oct 2008
    Messages:
    995
    Thanks Received:
    13
    Location:
    Surrey
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I remember having a paraffin heater in the kitchen................wind the wick up, then lower to get blue flames, all the wardrobes had black mould in n we didn't know why (water from paraffin), we lived in a victorian semi (15ft high ceilings 13" walls, the landing wallpaper drop was A COMPLETE ROLL of wallpaper, blinkin house was colder than an ice cube) the condensation on the sash cord windows would freeze at the bottom into an ice slope
     
  16. catlad

    catlad

    Joined:
    29 Jul 2011
    Messages:
    4,912
    Thanks Received:
    743
    Location:
    Lancashire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Aye.. tin bath! outside in the yard in summer and in the kitchen in winter.
     
Loading...

Share This Page