What flue pipe for small wood burner

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If I’ve pressed the correct button there should be attached a photo of a small Yukon pot bellied wood burner to be install into a man cave.
Question is should the flue which will go up through the roof and be circa 2m long be single rigid pipe or a twin walled flexi pipe.
Thanks in advance of any help
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8EE50433-3EF9-4E0F-A3A6-B317D8829ACD.png
 
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Isn't there a twin wall stainless rigid?

It would surely stay cleaner.

BTW if you can afford a modern multifuel, it will be more efficient and burn much cleaner.
 
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Neither, it should be twin-walled rigid, assuming your man-cave's structure is timber. It should also be a minimum of 4.5m tall to ensure the correct flue draught.
 
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Isn't there a twin wall stainless rigid?

It would surely stay cleaner.

BTW if you can afford a modern multifuel, it will be more efficient and burn much cleaner.
It will be very occasional use and is aesthetically more appealing than a modern stove.
 
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Neither, it should be twin-walled rigid, assuming your man-cave's structure is timber. It should also be a minimum of 4.5m tall to ensure the correct flue draught.
4.5 metres that would take it 2.5m above the roof. Presumably there is room for a pragmatic appraisal of what will be sufficient
 
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4.5 metres that would take it 2.5m above the roof. Presumably there is room for a pragmatic appraisal of what will be sufficient
The pragmatic appraisal is that independent testing organisations have carried out many tests on a large number of flue systems, and determined that 4.5 meters is the minimum required to produce an acceptable flue draught. Any less than that risks downdraught and potential carbon monoxide poisoning. I'd suggest that "installing the stove in a manner least likely to cause severe illness or death" is a reasonably pragmatic approach
 
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Although it is maybe worth noting that those instructions are 20 years old

And seemingly made in New Zealand quoting their standards, "Following these installation instructions and the instructions accompanying your flue kit will ensure that the heater complies with the requirements of the appropriate Safety Standard AS/NZS 2918."
 
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But of course, if the answers given are not what you want t hear, then they must be wrong.
What a juvenile response that is.....I didn’t for one moment suggest the answer was incorrect and I think you and your fellow keyboard warriors fully understand that. My question was simply intended to allow an examination of what allowances, if any, might be sensible bearing in mind the intended location and use of this small log burner. A simple ‘there aren’t any’ would have been more than adequate.
The burner is located in what is basically a shed with a flat roof and is 2.2 meters high.......a flue extending upwards from the burner with what would be 3meters above the flat roof is something I’ve never seen but hey ho
 
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