Woodburner in the corner, Distance from walls?

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Hi,

Currently installing a 5kw square nero woodburner in my own place.

I have it in the corner of the room and am planning on building a stone hearth under it with a small 4" upstand. I plan on keeping the wall behind bare plasterboard with decoration the same as the rest of the room.

My questions is I have positioned the woodburner roughly 150mm from the two walls form the back corners for the burner and 400mm from the back of the burner to the corner of the wall. The make up of the wall is 12mm plasterboard with 2x1-1/2 strapping with solid block.

What would you suggest doing to protect the walls from the hear/fire? I did think about cutting the plasterboard out and replacing with pink fire resistant sheets then re taping it back into the old plasterboard? but is this realy worth it, what are tha chances of the timber behind the platerboard getting hot enough to catch fire?

Cheers
 
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The chances are very real.. Contact your local HETAS installer to give you a price to fit it properly.

Plasterboard is not deemed as fire proof and there is a good chance that your plaster will crack and blow
 
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Im in a trade mate and Im not going to pay someone to do a job that Im 110% capable of doing.

Im just looking for some practical advice
 
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suggest you contact building control and ask there interpretation as they are the ones that have to approve the installation
 
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Im in a trade mate and Im not going to pay someone to do a job that Im 110% capable of doing.

Im just looking for some practical advice


By the very fact that you are asking advice on a DIY site clearly shows that you are not up to doing the job..... If it is your own home, then go for it but if you are doing the work for a paying customer, then do make sure that as said above, you contact Building control as they will be the ones who say yae or nae.

There is no such thing as 110%
 
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but is this realy worth it, what are tha chances of the timber behind the platerboard getting hot enough to catch fire?

Cheers

It's absolutely worth it, I've seen first hand studwork that's caught fire through plasterboard, stove was fitted by a builder who was complacent enough to believe he could do it without the proper training, the studwork was burning within an hour of the stove being lit for the first time, fortunately smoke was spotted coming out of the soffit before it had chance to burn the house down but another hour and I reckon it would have been goodbye house.

Pink plasterboard is insufficient, whatever you use MUST be rated to withstand a temperature of one thousand degrees celcius for thirty minutes, and must have a 12mm air gap behind it if it's protecting combustible materials. Even Thermalite blocks are considered to be inadequate as they cannot withstand that kind of heat.

There are rules about the size and depth of the hearth too, and also the clearance from that to combustible materials - it can't, for example, be stood on a wooden floor.

You really should get this installed by someone who is qualified - if you do it wrong and your house burns down your home insurance will not cover you
 
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Hi,

Im going to install it within regs just needed to know what they were. I think Im going to put heatsheild tiles right up the wall,the hearth will be 50mm stone. I allready have the twin pipe to go through the ceiling.

I was just asking beacause when you see pictures of them on google,some appear to be mounted very close to walls with no protection

There must be a difference dependant on the type of woodburner, mine appears to have the fire box, with an air gap around it then another layer of steel,on the rear there is also a heat sheild with yet another air gap.

http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=e...bdb5d2150b05b8&bpcl=37643589&biw=1331&bih=621
 
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There is a world of difference between stoves. As you have said some have convetion shields to allow an air gap between stove and shield, some don't. It can be a nightmare when a customer buys their own stove and wants it fitted "Like it is in the picture"
 
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Don't know if this help, but I'm having a Morso installed and according to the manual it says there must be 500mm clearance between the burner and any combustable material.
 
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Hi,

Im going to install it within regs just needed to know what they were.
Doc J of the Building Regulations is a good place to start


I think Im going to put heatsheild tiles right up the wall
Make sure they're certificated to withstand 1000ºC for 30 minutes and installed with a 12mm air gap behind them


the hearth will be 50mm stone
Standing on top of what base construction? This may well be significantly less than you need


I allready have the twin pipe to go through the ceiling.
That's nice, are you sure it's of the correct approved type and size for the application? Do you have the necessary firebreaks and ceiling ventilation panels to go with it? Are you able to install with the correct distance from combustible materials?


I was just asking beacause when you see pictures of them on google,some appear to be mounted very close to walls with no protection
Studio pictures are not the same thing as what you're actually allowed to do. Also, the second picture on that link is of a stove installed by another builder who did it without knowing what he was doing...



There must be a difference dependant on the type of woodburner, mine appears to have the fire box, with an air gap around it then another layer of steel,on the rear there is also a heat sheild with yet another air gap.
There is a difference, but in the world of solid fuel appliances the manufacturers instructions rarely override the regulations
 
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Hi,

Im going to install it within regs just needed to know what they were.
Doc J of the Building Regulations is a good place to start

Ok will download that.


I think Im going to put heatsheild tiles right up the wall
Make sure they're certificated to withstand 1000ºC for 30 minutes and installed with a 12mm air gap behind them

They will be stone, so this shouldnt be a problem

the hearth will be 50mm stone
Standing on top of what base construction? This may well be significantly less than you need

50mm stone slab not enough? It is just a small wood burner I doubt there will be any issues with this, the burner also sits on legs making it anouther 75mm off the slab.

I allready have the twin pipe to go through the ceiling.
That's nice, are you sure it's of the correct approved type and size for the application? Do you have the necessary firebreaks and ceiling ventilation panels to go with it? Are you able to install with the correct distance from combustible materials?

Yes it is the correct type and I have a ventalation plate with 50mm clearance from combustables.


I was just asking beacause when you see pictures of them on google,some appear to be mounted very close to walls with no protection
Studio pictures are not the same thing as what you're actually allowed to do. Also, the second picture on that link is of a stove installed by another builder who did it without knowing what he was doing...

Yes I understand what you are saying but I have also seen examples fitted not just displays. I was just pointing out that there must be exeptions to the rule as there are so many different typs of stoves.



There must be a difference dependant on the type of woodburner, mine appears to have the fire box, with an air gap around it then another layer of steel,on the rear there is also a heat sheild with yet another air gap.
There is a difference, but in the world of solid fuel appliances the manufacturers instructions rarely override the regulations
 
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[quote="jackthemac";p="2566687"
I allready have the twin pipe to go through the ceiling.
That's nice, are you sure it's of the correct approved type and size for the application? Do you have the necessary firebreaks and ceiling ventilation panels to go with it? Are you able to install with the correct distance from combustible materials?

Yes it is the correct type

How do you know? What does the rating sticker on the side say? All twin wall insulated pipe is not created equal, and some of what's out there isn't suitable. I assume it's 150mm internal diameter? If not, it's wrong anyway
 
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