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Wooden Floor help

Discussion in 'Floors, Stairs and Lofts' started by Alpaca, 28 Aug 2013.

  1. Alpaca

    Alpaca

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    My wooden floor had some scrapes so I attempted to sand it down.

    However, after sanding it down, I am finding it hard to figure out how to restore the finish. I cannot remember what species of wood the floor is made of. I think it is birch but had trouble finding a birch woodstain. I used a 'Light Oak' woodstain but the result was far from ideal, what you can see the image.

    What is the best strategy now in order to save the floor?

    All advice appreciated.

     
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  3. jay679

    jay679

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    Are those stains, or low spots where the sander hasn't removed the top surface?
     
  4. Alpaca

    Alpaca

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    Those are the areas that I sanded, and tried to re-stain with the Light Oak woodstain.
     
  5. i_am_fubar

    i_am_fubar

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    Hate to say it, but the only way you will get a consistent colour now will be to sand the lot and re-stain.

    Hire a floor sander if it's a big space and you can afford it.

    Nifty tip if you ever have scratches again. Try rubbing a walnut over them, the oils frequently make the scratches invisible.

    Fubar.
     
  6. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    That's what it looks like to me. Needs re-sanding to take another few mm off.

    Cheers
    Richard
     
  7. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    I'm almost certain it's not a stain. Running a finger over it would confirm, but I think it's low spots in the floor caused by furniture or footfall. The sander has flattened the floor around them but the dips remain. It's what the surface of the rest of the floor would have looked like before sanding. I saw a similar effect when I sanded one of my floors.

    Depending on how deep this is, you might be able to get it with some localised sanding with a belt sander, being careful to feather out to the surrounding floorboards, so the difference in level wasn't too noticeable. Or sand those areas by hand.

    I wouldn't suggest staining without sanding, as it won't come out the same colour as the rest of the floor.

    Cheers
    Richard
     
  8. JasonF

    JasonF

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    Carpet
     
  9. Corazones

    Corazones

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    Are you sure the floor was stained in the first place? It may be natural darkening, or the effect of oiling or clear varnishing. I suggest a bit of detective work first - try scraping the surface of a corner and see if a layer flakes off, and compare it with the wood below. If the floor was oiled (you may be able to smell this), then the "stain" could be water marking.
    Alec.
     
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  11. aclifford

    aclifford

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    To reduce sanding infections, you need to 'pop the grain'. Popping the grain is easy and is done by getting the floor wet before standing in order to open the grain of the wood back up after the final sanding. Wood absorbs a greater amount of stain when the grain is opened. Contractors often stray the floors with a pesticide sprayer.
     
  12. Bosswhite

    Bosswhite

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    Years ago I was discussing this problem of sanding floors and restaining with a collegue in the carpet trade, he said exactly the same thing,

    People spend a fortune on hiring equiptment or getting a firm in to do the work and it never looks the same again, he reckoned within a year people came to his business to have the floor carpeted.
     
  13. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    Personally I like sanded floors with strategically places rugs and carpets. They look so much more elegant than wall to wall fitted carpets, and carpets that can be taken up and properly beaten don't harbour dust and mites in the same way. It's also easier to change things round.

    I wonder if the OP sorted out his problem? The photo definitely showed unsanded dips in the floorboards.
    Cheers
    Richard
     
  14. jrh14

    jrh14

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    Hello,
    What I would suggest is rent a sander and sand the whole floor down. Then re-stain.
     
  15. trent78

    trent78

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    Hardwood floors are a big draw, and they're worth whatever rehabing you have to do to them. Once you resand and stain, think about laying down the best sealant and high-gloss shine you can. The more that floor looks like a basketball court, the more you, your guests or tenants or appraisers or buyers will like them. Totally worth it.
     
  16. geraldthehamster

    geraldthehamster

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    Eek.
     
  17. GG123

    GG123

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    Hire a floor sander - should do the job!
     
  18. DIYnot Local

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