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Workshop: Lots of powerpoints, or some extension leads?

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by Morrisman, 16 Sep 2011.

  1. Morrisman

    Morrisman

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    I'm building another workshop, 6 x 8, and I'm thinking of just having a couple of good stout extension leads rather than the multiple double sockets every few metres that I used in my last 'shop.

    Multiple sockets are useful, if you are working within the cords length of your power tool, but that is not often the case in a bigger workshop.

    So, to my point, can you really overheat and burn up an extension cord by using it half rolled up, or is it true that you should unroll the whole thing before putting any serious load on it?
     
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  3. EFLImpudence

    EFLImpudence

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    Yes, if near the maximum capacity of the cable.

    Inspection lamp - probably not.
     
  4. wingcoax

    wingcoax

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    Having seen what can happen to an extension lead if used to power a heater when not unrolled i always run it out fully whatever it is feeding.
     
  5. big-all

    big-all

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  6. ericmark

    ericmark

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    Yes it does melt the lead. And not just with AC when using Air Arc a hunk of cable was left in a coil and it melted the insulation and it was a very lose coil.

    If you watch welding cables which are draped on scaffold you will see them move away from each other as the arc is struck.

    I do think one can easy go OTT with workshop sockets in my wife's workshop (Kitchen) I found she always wanted more but many were unused or only used with very light intermittently used equipment and I did in the end go for the 4 way adaptors which are far easier to reposition as she rearranges her work space.

    Unless one goes for the track one will never be satisfied so a mixture does make some sense. But even a 1 meter lead set will extend reach by two meters so I would use short extension leads which will not require coiling up.

    Welding is the problem in any workshop where earth currents can really cause some damage. I used minimum of 35mm sq for any earth bonding so welders would not burn out earth cables.
     
  7. Morrisman

    Morrisman

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    So, it sounds like a good option would be a generous spread of sockets, and extension leads made no longer than absolutely required. Then plug 'em into the nearest socket. :D 6 metres long should be ample.

    I've often toyed with putting longer leads on some of my grinders, saws and such, as most are barely 2 metres long, one particular tool only came with 1 metre cable!

    Welding, I am guilty of only winding out enough cable to reach what I need, but I don't do particularly long welds really.

    It is still a couple of months before the 'shop is finished and I can finally move my junk in, so I'm just day dreaming and planning things out right now.
    :oops:

    [​IMG]
     
  8. big-all

    big-all

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    a size off workshop to die for :D :D

    i would have worked what was going where and put some floor sockets in the areas most likely to have stationary furniture or fixed equipment
     
  9. Alarm

    Alarm

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    Just to add, we had a "home made" 100 mtr extension reel on a wooden drum. I started to weld at about 160 amps on some long runs. Everything stopped after a bit.
    We had a nice moltent reel of soggy insulation and bare conductor.

    Lesson learnt :D
     
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  11. timbim

    timbim

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    The other option is to hang single sockets on chains above machines and work benches. I've worked in a couple of shops with that arrangement and it makes life much easier, no leads running across the floor to worry about.
     
  12. kevindgas

    kevindgas

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    better still put hanging sockets on springs to give even more flexibility
     
  13. JohnW2

    JohnW2

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    Indeed - or even springing cables. I have several of these hanging from the ceiling of my large (cellar) 'workshop' - with clips to hold them up out of the way when not in use (apologies for mess :)):


    Kind Regards, John.
     
  14. Morrisman

    Morrisman

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    I do a lot of welding and grinding and dragging around of metal and suchforth, so decided against that idea.

    My latest project, built the chassis, suspension etc and such from the ground up, and there is a 'glass body to go on it.

    [​IMG]

    This is my current 'workshop', about 8' by 12'. Not many cats get swung around in there when the car is inside.

    [​IMG]

    B

    Now this is a good idea. :D I can see this happening in my shop.

    I'll have this open truss roof design so plenty of places to hang from. maybe even some elasticated rubber cord, to keep them above head height until needed.

    [​IMG]
     
  15. big-all

    big-all

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    love the drive train :D
    taking its a classic car 1940ish ??
     
  16. Morrisman

    Morrisman

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    The front axle is 1930 Model A Ford, the front discs are Mitsubishi L300, modified and bracketed to fit by moi.

    The motor is 5.7 litre Chevy from a 1970's Camaro and the rear axle is from a 1960's Mustang.

    The rest is all handmade by me, chassis, brackets, suspension included. :D

    The body is a replica 1928 Model A Ford pickup.

    [​IMG]

    This was what I started with, plus some doors.

    [​IMG]

    :cool:
     
  17. big-all

    big-all

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    fantastic job keep it up :D :D
    the very simple suspension was giving me the clues to the age you where aiming to be authentic too ;)
     
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