Would someone swap a panel on interior doors?

Discussion in 'Wood / Woodwork / Carpentry' started by WolfOfBakerStreet, 13 Jun 2021.

  1. WolfOfBakerStreet

    WolfOfBakerStreet

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    The door pictured has a cracked panel. I can cover one side of the crack with a nice over the door mirror but not the other side. I have a boiler cupboard door in the bathroom where one side isn't visible so if I could swap the two panels it would solve the problem. Is there someone that would do this for me?

    Can't restain or varnish, only option is to repaint the doors white but it would be a massive job as window frames, stairs, skirting boards, everything in the house is the same colour as this door.
     
  2. WolfOfBakerStreet

    WolfOfBakerStreet

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  4. foxhole

    foxhole

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    Start painting
     
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  5. JobAndKnock

    JobAndKnock

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    The question is, are the beandings holding the panel in place integral, or are they the traditional pinned type loose bearings. The way to check is to get a photo of the top edge of the door, although I suspect that the beads are integral.

    If the beads are loose fitted traditional ones, then the job is fairly straightforward. You can tell these because there will be little tell tale signs of where the beads have been pinned and the corner mitres might be slightly open

    If the beads are integral it will mean cutting out (and in doing so destroying) the beads from one side of the doors with something like a multitool, freeing the panels (which could well be glued in place, so again possibility of damage), cleaning up the edges of the panels, cleaning up the panel recesses with a router (because the multitool cuts will be somewhat imprecise), swapping the panels, making up (possibly by routing from scratch) replacement beads, fitting (pinning) the beads, stopping and filling the pin holes and finally staining andd lacquering to match the existing doors. I have done stuff like this on doors in listed buildings (the last time on some 1930s frame and panel doors made with integral panels) and I can tell you that is not easy to do, let alone do well, and will probably always be noticeable. TBH it is probably more effort than the door is worth and certainly more expensive than a new door - because those doors look like stained pine mass produced ones

    Maybe a good DIY project?
     
    Last edited: 13 Jun 2021
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  7. JohnD

    JohnD

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    I can't see the crack. Where is it?
     
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