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Condensation!!!

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opdrcartagena

from United Kingdom

Joined: 25 Jan 2006
Posts: 5
Location: Kent,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2006 11:31 pm Reply with quote

Hi,

I have a problem with condensation on my window. The window is approximately 14' across and 7' down. This is made up into lots of smaller rectangular individual panels. I have had secondary glazing recently installed (would have preferred double glazing, local council put the mockers on that, Conservation area!) this doesn't seem to have stopped it. I have the window slightly open for circulation but still it occurs. Any ideas how to stop or control it?
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JohnD

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 27, 2006 11:03 am Reply with quote

When you say slightly open, you do mean the outer window is open and the secondary window is as tight shut as you can get it, not the other way round?

Which surface is the condensation forming on?

How old is your house?
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opdrcartagena

from United Kingdom

Joined: 25 Jan 2006
Posts: 5
Location: Kent,
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 1:18 pm Reply with quote

Hi,

Thanks for your reply. I have the outer window slightly open with the secondary glazing shut. Should this be the other way around then?

The flat is in a building which is about 100 years old.

Thanks
_________________________________
Sorry forgot to mention which surface the condensation is forming on!!

It forms on the inside of the outer window and with the window being so huge there is quite a bit of it!.
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JohnD

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 1:23 pm Reply with quote

opdrcartagena wrote:
Hi,

Thanks for your reply. I have the outer window slightly open with the secondary glazing shut. Should this be the other way around then?

Thanks

No, that's the right way to do it. The outside air is colder and holds less moisture. If you ever make your own secondary glazing, it's useful to include a breathing hole (6mm drilled will do) to the outside. If you stuff a bit of fibreglass insulation in it that will keep the insects out.

Which surface is the moisture condensing on, and does it appear at certain times of day?
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opdrcartagena

from United Kingdom

Joined: 25 Jan 2006
Posts: 5
Location: Kent,
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 1:28 pm Reply with quote

The condensation forms on the inside of the outside window. It only happens when the wind is blowing in a certain direction, very odd I know!

If the wind is blowing onto the window then there is no condensation. If it is not blowing onto the window then this is when it forms.
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JohnD

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 1:39 pm Reply with quote

OK. If it's on the inside of the outer window, then moisture is getting into the gap. And if you're ventilating the gap there must be a fair amount of it. If you're sure the secondary glazing is tightly sealed, so no damp air from the house is going in there (test for drafts with a joss stick or cigarette (ugh, cough) for smoke getting through).


If not that, then maybe the old window frame is damp (rain or past condensation got into the wood) or the wall in the reveal is damp (old brickwork, esp. is it gets rain on it).

A temporary cause can be fresh emulsion paint from recent decorating. How long ago was the secondary glazing fitted?

I think my money's on damp woodwork or leaking moist air from the room. Old houses do tend to be more damp, as there will be damp concrete (or bare earth) under the ground floor; dpcs may be missing; soft bricks in lime mortar are absorbent and may be badly pointed; the chimneys have probably been blocked by now.

Is it a living room? Is it worse in the morning? Do you get condensation on other windows?
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opdrcartagena

from United Kingdom

Joined: 25 Jan 2006
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Location: Kent,
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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 1:52 pm Reply with quote

The walls are made of stone, about 3 ft thick.
The secondary glazing was finally installed about two weeks ago. I had a slight problem with the window company. It took them seven months to make the damn thing. The window is the only window, the flat is an open plan design.
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JohnD

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:02 pm Reply with quote

Now there's an interesting thing! Like a martello tower? I bet those walls are a huge reservoir of heat and moisture!

How big a gap do you have between the original and secondary glazing, and is this a wall reveal or a wooden frame? If it's a wall it might benefit from a moisture-proof lining.

Otherwise I'm still thinking about air from the room leaking into the gap, esp if it depends on wind direction which will affect airflow.

With the secondary glazing closed, how is the room ventilated? If you open the secondary glazing a crack, can you detect a draft into/out of the room/glazing gap?

edited to add, if open plan, how does the steam from cooking and bathing get out? One floor of my house is open plan and I can't stop cooking smells drifting round the whole floor
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