1. We are pleased to announce the 'Home Automation' forum. Click here to get involved!

Brick Shed/Outhouse

Discussion in 'Building' started by danmk1984, 11 Mar 2010.

  1. danmk1984

    Joined:
    10 Sep 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Derbyshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    My wife and I are currently looking to clear some space in our 3rd bedroom by moving our gym equipment into the brick shed to the side of the house. I could easily clear the shed and lay an old carpet on top of the concrete, but the plan is to use the equipment year round. It can get cold during the winter as the shed is a single layer of bricks with big gaps around the door. Its only electricity supply is via a board mounted with a socket and a light fitting with a cable that runs overhead through the frame of the kitchen window and plugs into the socket in there! I'm not even sure if this works anymore as it looks a bit dodgy so I've left it well alone so far.

    I’d like to tidy it up a bit so that it is useable. Ideally just seal gaps so that we don’t have drafts, possibly get a decent light fitting and socket put in so that during the winter I can plug a heater in and have some light and the radio. I will probably also need to fit a new door. Is it even possible to get an electrical supply put into an outhouse?

    A lot of people in the street have incorporated this building in to their kitchen, but because of the strange extension that was added in the 70’s this isn’t really possible without some significant changes and a new kitchen which we are not considering at the moment, but might in the future, so I don’t want to spend too much if possible.

    I suppose I should mention that the shed is about 3m x 1.7m and sits a gate's width away from the kitchen window.

    If anyone could offer any advice or a plan of action it would be very welcome. I will be doing any work myself other than any electrical work, and it might be that I have to make a number of compromises, but I’d like to get the best result I can. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    Joined:
    30 Jun 2009
    Messages:
    18,951
    Thanks Received:
    1,991
    Location:
    Londonderry
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    With it being single skin brickwork, you main problems would be cold walls and damp, this could mean any heating over the winter/colder months could be wasted.
    You could consider a plasterboarded stud wall, with insulation installed in the stud or fixing thermaline boards.
    But that will cost money and time.

    The electric will need to be signed off as it will come under part p of building regs, so a wise choice would be using a registered electrician(member of a domestic installers, scheme provider)
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1
  3. danmk1984

    Joined:
    10 Sep 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Derbyshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thank you I will consider the costs involved in thermaline boards.

    I can see the roof also causing a problem, from what I can see it is concrete slabs with a render on the top (it's covered in Ivy at the moment so I don't have a clear view). There is no sign of any water leakage but does that mean that I would be able just to board the ceiling as well?
     
  4. PrenticeBoyofDerry

    Joined:
    30 Jun 2009
    Messages:
    18,951
    Thanks Received:
    1,991
    Location:
    Londonderry
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Your best doing the ceiling too, as this will also be a cold area, this can be insulated a number ways again thermaline will do. But you will need to fix some joist to the ceiling area to carry the boards.
     
    • Thanks Thanks x 1

Share This Page