Conservatory dwarf wall cracking where it joins house

Discussion in 'Building' started by bruce225, 3 Oct 2007.

  1. bruce225

    Joined:
    10 Jul 2007
    Messages:
    21
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Just noticed today that the dwarf wall which is attached to the house is cracked on both sides with a half a cm gap inside and out,it's as if the whole conservatory has moved away from the house.

    The plastic frame work is still attached to the house apart from the first 3-4 inches at the top of the wall which looks like it's come away with it.

    The rest of the wall as no cracks on it, and is in tip top condition.

    Should i be alarmed or just get it repointed and sealed and see if it get's worse..

    it's approx ten years old...

    Cheers
     
  2. simoniris

    Joined:
    26 Sep 2007
    Messages:
    97
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Location:
    Worcestershire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Shouldn't be too concerned - has it appeared or just not been noticed before? If you have been affected by all the water this summer then all the shifting water tables and saturation and drying out of subsoil may have caused it. If you're worried put a stick on marker across the gap and watch it [not as in sit there for hours but check weekly for a few months] to see if crack enlarges. You might be able to pick one up in a diy store.
    It's obviously a foundation issue. Substructure could have been constructed in one of two ways [3 if you count 'badly']. The first would be trench fill footings with an independent slab. The second would be a raft foundation - slab & footings poured as one effectively [slightly more to it than that but not worth going into]. If the whole structure has moved away from the house or is sitting on a slant with no other cracks through any other masonry it is likely to be a raft. If this has settled a little then so long as it has now fully settled, fill the gaps and nothing to worry about. If it's trenchfill then the cause will likely be the same but there could be other issues with the structure. For the gap you have it will be very minor but could be a bit of damp penetration here and there so at the moment and so long as it doesn't move any further it shouldn't be anything to worry about.
    Obviously without seeing it we can't say for sure.
    If problems persist contact your doctor. Alternatively call in a surveyor to investigate.
     
  3. noseall

    Joined:
    2 Feb 2006
    Messages:
    21,817
    Thanks Received:
    1,398
    Location:
    Staffordshire
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    i'm never surprised at the standard of work for connie bases. they are often an overlooked and underpriced element of the overall quote.

    common blunders are, blocking off existing underfloor vents, shallow foundations, building over and in line with drains, inadequate bonding of masonry to existing building etc, etc.

    many properties will have a common sewer running at the rear of their property, usually situated at the ideal position for the backwall of the connie.
    connie installers will still site a wall directly over a drain. :eek:

    yours may just be settlement differential, but i would still check for something more sinister.:cool:
     
  4. bruce225

    Joined:
    10 Jul 2007
    Messages:
    21
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Thanks for the replies..

    Will keep checking it to see if it gets worse,will repairs come under building insurance if needed ?

    Cheers
     
  5. The-brickie

    Joined:
    28 Feb 2007
    Messages:
    396
    Thanks Received:
    10
    Location:
    Essex
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    I have to agree totally with your post here mate, but I will lay some blame on the punter wanting it done for nowt.
     
  6. bruce225

    Joined:
    10 Jul 2007
    Messages:
    21
    Thanks Received:
    0
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yeah after agree, but this punter bought the house with the connie allready attached,so the short cuts are not my doing, but now my problem
     
  7. The-brickie

    Joined:
    28 Feb 2007
    Messages:
    396
    Thanks Received:
    10
    Location:
    Essex
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Depends, but I'm sure the insurance co. will try and wriggle out of it, blaming the builders and saying go back to them, it should be guaranteed.

    An Essex company I worked for used to just pour the front 'facet' of the conny and install ground beams tied into the house below ground level, I would have thought these had a tendency to tip a little on settlement.

    If anybody wants to know which company, send me a email ;)
     
  8. stanna

    Joined:
    5 Dec 2006
    Messages:
    87
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Yep rebuilt many of these after dodgy conny companies turn up dig out 6 inches of soil fill it with concrete then start laying brick in the afternoon.

    You would think building control would get a grip of this as its sickeneing for the customer whose laid out 10k for a shoddy job.

    there may be no more movement but i wouldnt hold out too much hope given the track record on this issue.

    Dig an inspection hole at the side and see what its sat on.
    Also if you had a survey done you can, depending on what you asked for, claim against the surveyor for not picking it up.

    Did a gable sometime back and the surveyors insurance had to cough up the 8k as they failed to notice the house was built on rice krispies with the gable 12 inches out of plumb.
     
  9. freddymercurystwin

    Joined:
    21 Jan 2007
    Messages:
    15,089
    Thanks Received:
    1,657
    Location:
    Devon
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Try and pay attention to the dates stanna! :rolleyes:
     
  10. stanna

    Joined:
    5 Dec 2006
    Messages:
    87
    Thanks Received:
    1
    Country:
    United Kingdom
    Ha Ha sorry mate.

    Was getting off the bottom of the page.

    Newbie.....does it show?
     

Share This Page