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cooker hood wiring ...

Discussion in 'Electrics UK' started by alb, 2 Mar 2008.

  1. alb

    alb

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    Hi all,
    am looking at wiring in a new cooker hood :
    cable on hood is very short & the nearest socket is down behind the cooker (10 inches or so off ground)
    We have a gas cooker & nothing is connected to this socket at the moment - no red cooker switch - just a single socket.
    Have checked fuse box & it is supllied by it's own 32a MCB - marked 'cooker' (!).
    rest of mains sockets are run from a seperate 32a MCB .
    am guessing this would be to connect a hob or even ignition for gas cooker to?

    would it be ok to spur from this socket up to the height of the cooker hood (directly up behind plasterboard where hood will go) coming out at an FCU at top of chimney ?
    many thanks for any help.
     
  2. Steve

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    You'll probably find that socket is fed by 6mm² cable. You will struggle to get another cable in there.
    Its fine to use for gas ignition, that will plug in, it only consumes a few watts, plus the oven light ;)

    I would find another source of power for the hood.
     
  3. alb

    alb

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    hi steve thanks for the reply,
    ok guess I should spur from the sockets above worktop to the right of cooker then instead..
    wanted to hide as much wiring as poss but to do it safely(!) -
    which of these is best ? :
    [​IMG]

    the next closet socket is to the right of cooker above worktop,

    So I'll I spur to the side of the socket for the fcu, then channel in straight up to a flex outlet outside top of chimney & wire hood into that,
    ( leaving a bit of cable visible coming out of top of chimney)

    or is it ok to channel flex from fcu behind splashback & then straight up to outlet inside of chimney, hiding all cable ?

    plasterboard wall so shouldn't be too hard to sort out either way...
     
  4. thompsk

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    Just a couple of thing there to bear in mind:
    1. Ensure that the socket you will be connecting into is'nt a spur and that it is on a ring.
    2. Make sure you can still access the socket for the hood.
    3. This work is notifiable to your local council.
     
  5. alb

    alb

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    hi thompsk,
    thanks for reply,
    1. not on spur already :)
    2. would i need to wire a socket then at chimney, and plug in instead of a flex outlet with hood wired straight into it?
    or do you mean it's best to have the socket / outlet outside of chimney as in my first pic ?
    3. yep am looking into that part of the equation now !

    :)
     
  6. RF Lighting

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    The socket does not need to be readilly accesible, as you are proposing to install an accesible isolator.

    It should still be accesible for inspection, testing and maintanence.

    IMO behind a removable chimney is fine.
     
  7. Softus

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    I went to fault-find a cooker hood recently, and the socket outlet was accessible only by removing the appliance, which had been incorrectly installed (with mounting screws accessible only from above, screwed in before the cupboards were installed), and only by damaging some tile grout and paintwork, which needed to be made good afterwards.

    The fault: one plugtop fuse. :rolleyes:

    The cost: two hours of work and some gnashing of teeth.
     

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