short-term fix for leaking slate roof

Discussion in 'Roofing and Guttering' started by russellpeters, 30 May 2013.

  1. russellpeters

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    Hello Forum Members,

    My wife and I have recently bought a 1890 Victorian end-of-terrace house with a hipped main roof and a pitched roof of the usual kind for the rear extension.

    Our building survey revealed that the roof tiles were very old, had reached their end of life and needed to be replaced soon but not immediately.

    I have examined the main roof in great detail for signs of dampness, leak, wood rot etc. The roof is very well ventilated. The roof does not have any underlay under the tiles and nor does it have any insulation on the loft floor. Other than this the roof is in good condition.

    For the rear extension roof I have only examined it from a bedroom window and it looks okay. There are a few tiles that look a bit displaced and a few places where fixes by previous owners are of a poor quality but there are no visible large gaps or cracks.

    We plan to get the roof re-tiled (and adding underlay, insulation etc.) in 2 years time but we were hoping to not have to make any expenditure on the roof till then.

    All our gutters are in good condition and have been cleaned and repaired recently.

    Unfortunately recently we have discovered damp patches on the bathroom interior wall. The bathroom is in the rear extension. The patches becomes worse when it rains and they become dry when the weather is warm for a few days. I am positive that water is getting under the tiles of the rear extension roof.

    Till the time we get the roofs fixed properly is there any short-term solution for preventing water from getting under the tiles and creating dampness?
     
  2. alastairreid

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    If you can post a pic of the roof where the water is getting in we can advise better.

    Either way if the tiles are broken/cracked they need replaced.
     

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