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Hole saws for spots


 
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craig1

from United Kingdom

Joined: 14 Sep 2005
Posts: 174
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2006 12:11 pm Reply with quote

Hello,

Been looking at installing some spot lights in the kitchen.

Also buying some hole saws for this job and for

future DIY jobs. Does the cut out for the spots have to be the exact

size as stated on the lighting instructions as most hole saws dont

match the required size.


cheers.
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mw3ybx

from United Kingdom

Joined: 14 Apr 2006
Posts: 3
Location: Pembrokeshire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Fri Apr 14, 2006 12:25 pm Reply with quote

Hi Craig

This all depends on the depth of the rim of the spot light. Some lights have deep rims so the hole does not have to be spot on, but within mm .. Electrical wholesalers will have the right size holesaw for the job.

Dan
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craig1

from United Kingdom

Joined: 14 Sep 2005
Posts: 174
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 5:39 pm Reply with quote

Cheers!

Thanks for the info Dan.
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Porker

from United Kingdom

Joined: 28 Oct 2003
Posts: 230
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 8:58 pm Reply with quote

Just a tip. Cut a hole in an old piece of plasterboard before you try to fit your lights just to check. I've just fitted some that wanted a 68mm holesaw. Can't find one so used a 64mm and had to notch out for the clip brackets with a stanley knife.
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RF Lighting

from United Kingdom

Joined: 31 Mar 2006
Posts: 17034
Location: Leeds,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 858 times

PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 9:54 pm Reply with quote

If your ceiling is lath and plaster make sure you take it very steady when drilling the holes, as it is very easy to remove great chunks of plaster without even trying.
Also don't forget Part P of the building regs requires this work to be notified to LABC

Rob
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Pens

from United Kingdom

Joined: 17 Jan 2006
Posts: 2437
Location: Kent,
United Kingdom
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PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 10:34 pm Reply with quote

http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?cId=100199&ts=37191&id=24300

Not cheap but it cuts a clean hole in ceilings and will adjust to accommodate most lights
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Jim2287

from United Kingdom

Joined: 22 Oct 2005
Posts: 226
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 10:35 pm Reply with quote

we use those, but its seems a bit expensive for a diyer who is only going to use it "one off"


cheaper to get out a compass and cut a hole with a pad saw ( bought for as little as 1 or maybe less )
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Pens

from United Kingdom

Joined: 17 Jan 2006
Posts: 2437
Location: Kent,
United Kingdom
Thanked: 2 times

PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 11:12 pm Reply with quote

Jim2287 wrote:
we use those, but its seems a bit expensive for a diyer who is only going to use it "one off"


cheaper to get out a compass and cut a hole with a pad saw ( bought for as little as 1 or maybe less )


Of course you do, so do most people who want a perfect hole

1/2 the problem with diy projects is the tools used. You know how hard it is even with practice to cut a small round hole in plastered plasterboard.

My advise - save the money on labour - spend some of it on pro tools then you've got 1/2 a chance of a pro looking job
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Jim2287

from United Kingdom

Joined: 22 Oct 2005
Posts: 226
Location: United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sat Apr 15, 2006 11:29 pm Reply with quote

hehe true


not that hard to cut circle with pad saw ... but if you cant do it straight away then its a time waster to practice, like u said
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PartyCan

from United Kingdom

Joined: 15 Mar 2006
Posts: 43
Location: Staffordshire,
United Kingdom

PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:13 am Reply with quote

Got my cutters from a place called CAROLS chaps where i live only payed 2.99 for it and it cuts all sizes of holes, it fits in the end of your drill.

I cut mine with the next size down and just went round the hole with a round file so that the downlights was a tight fit in the hole.

It doss a nice round hole as well but where somert on your eyes before you do the cutting because of the plaster getting in your eyes.
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viewer

from United Kingdom

Joined: 02 Apr 2005
Posts: 772
Location: United Kingdom
Thanked: 52 times

PostPosted: Sun Apr 16, 2006 5:47 pm Reply with quote

Hi,
The Maplins set of holecutters is 4-99 and is great for cutting plasterboard and softwood. I've used them for SELV 12 v & GU10 perfect sizes included. Great. Better than the more expensive ones I've had for years and which stay in the box.
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