BT junction box

Discussion in 'Alarms, CCTV & Telephones' started by LankyPaddy, 14 Aug 2011.

  1. LankyPaddy

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    Quick question... trying to tidy things up during renovations. Can I replace junction box 1 (shown in the image below) with jelly crimps (internally)?


    It is currently rather unsightly with the black BT cable entering the window on one side of our hall window, through an internal junction box and exiting the window on the other side. Plan is to bury the cable in the plasterboard, but the junction box is too big.

    If this is not a recommended course of action, does anyone have any alternative solutions? It would be much appreciated.
     
  2. Bodgeitandleggit

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    Yes, you can use jelly crimps and bury it but its not ideal as can cause probelms if you have a fault...or then again it could last forever
     
  3. ChrisOxford

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    Be aware that tricks like that can slow down ADSL (broadband connection) too.

    Personally, I would re-site the NTE5 to the end of the incoming BT cable, then run an unbroken run of new cable in whatever way you want from the IDC terminals in the NTE5 to wherever you want your phone to be. No hidden joints to go wrong that way.

    Be aware that messing with the incoming side of the NTE5 is prohibited by BT, although often done from what I've seen.
     
  4. JimLoskot

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    yes, do as advised above or replace junction box 1 with a proper telecoms junction box and then run a wire straight from that to the NTE5.
    I've no idea about the legality of doing such things although a quick google says you will be "in breach of your licence to use the phone service and your service provider may charge if they have to come to rectify a fault caused by your efforts" and this "If you successfully move your Master socket to have more “high quality user-side wiring” then good for you, but it is ILLEGAL to do this, if it is clear and obvious that you moved it yourself and BT issue’s a fine and/or terminate your line. Don’t say you weren't warned."
    wiring telephone stuff is easy if you have a proper metal IDC tool, loads of guides on the net. Usual common sense approach applies, keep cable lengths short and junctions to a minimum, especially to the master socket. Try to run any ADSL stuff off the master socket as you will get better speeds etc..
     
  5. ChrisOxford

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    Also don't forget that you can get a shock from the line if someone rings you. Not enough to directly kill you (unless you're very unlucky), but enough to throw you off your ladder.
     
  6. bernardgreen

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    Strictly speaking any interference with the BT (or Openreach ) cable and junction boxes is a breach of contract and could result in service being terminated.

    That said if the NTE 5 is moved to the location of the junction box 1 (in the diagram ) then the chances of a breach of contract being invoked is very small.

    Then fit a filtered front plate and run ADSL in one cable and all phones in another cable from that faceplate.

    Ensure the new location of the NTE 5 is in a place where you can easily plug in a test phone should you ever be asked to by BT during fault finding procedures. A non accessible NTE 5 is a sign to OpenReach that the NTE 5 is not in it's original location.
     
  7. LankyPaddy

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    Thanks for the advice guys.

    Unfortunately Junction 1 is not in a location suitable for the NTE5, since it is in the top right corner of the window. So either way, I need a junction to extend the cable.

    If not going for the buried jelly crimps, another option might be to put an external junction box and come in from there and connect straight into a NTE5 below. Taking notes from the ADSL thread already running, I could then extend this to the room next door where my modem is. Would this be preferable?


    But looking at the BT66 external junction unit, it seems that these use jelly crimps too, but Chris does your post suggest that jelly crimps can slow my ADSL or did you mean the existing arrangement as a whole was rubbish? I can certainly see the advantage of removing junction box 2 altogether.

    Is the advantage of the BT66 over buried jelly crimps simply that they are accessible and not buried as in my first plan?

    Thanks
     
  8. bernardgreen

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    The BT66 and jelly crimps is how I would repair a cut drop wire "in an emergency " provided I had the correct external cable to continue the circuit to a point inside the building where the NTE 5 was located.

    While internal wire can be crimped together with external wire in the same crimp fork the joint may not be the best. If the wires are different diameters then the larger one may force the sides of the fork apart and the thinner wire is not properly gripped by the fork. Therefor the crimp to use is the one with two forks to accept the different sizes of wire, one in each fork.
     
  9. LankyPaddy

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    Ah I see, so my best option (other than paying BT £200 for a new connection) is if I use a BT66 to connect to a new piece of external CW1128 cable. I can then take that down the wall and pop through into the house where my new NTE5 is and connect straight into it. Sound good?
     
  10. bernardgreen

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    Sounds like a good way to repair a damaged drop wire.
     

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