Cost of building in blocks + Vs Bricks

Discussion in 'Building' started by djwhite04, 1 Apr 2012.

  1. djwhite04

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    We are building a double storey extension to the back and side of our house. Can anyone tell me if it is cheaper to build in block work and then render or build with bricks? (The existing house is brickwork that has been fully painted White so we would potentially need to render the whole house) Thanks
     
  2. noseall

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    999 out of a 1000, if i was given the choice - show brickwork every time.

    Render is a pain, plus it is a long term maintenance issue.
     
  3. ^woody^

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    Build costs are marginally different if anything, but then render is an ongoing cost and risk, which is not present with brickwork

    Planning conditions would normally require the extension to match the house, but that would not mean painting brickwork or rendering. If the house is brickwork, then build in brickwork and leave it unpainted
     
  4. tim00

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    Fully support noseall and woody. My take on this is: never paint brick or stonework. Painted render can cause all kinds of difficulties, not least, condensation - even with "approved" paint.
    If you were to attempt to render over the in-situ painted brickwork you would first have to grind off the paint - lots of work esp. at the reveals and details.
    FWIW: the painting of brickwork Victorian and Edwardian terrace houses over the past 40 years has resulted in slumlike eyesores, and the mutilation of what should be national treasures. Go to Bradford, Oldham, and Longsight Manchester and weep.
     
  5. dishman

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    Sorry to revive this thread, but I am curious. Planning extensive rennovation to my 1930s semi (as I have mentioned in many recent posts) which is one quater pebbledash (which was painted white at some point) and the rest brick.

    As the pebbledash is 80years old it has started to blow out in areas. Many neighbours re-rendered a while back and the norm in the street is smooth render, painted white.

    If you say, this is a nightmare to maintain, can cause damp etc. What is the correct/best way to re-render. Sand/Cement and paint white? Lime based render? One of these modern pre-coloured polymer mixes? Or new pebbledash (which although an original feature...would look very out of place).

    Part of the my rennovation includes an two story extention which will match the original. I assume that up to the render line it will be brick, and past that point it would be cheaper/best to use blockwork? Any thoughts on that whilst on the same subject as the original post?
     
  6. indus

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    I'd be interested to know the answer as well. Most of the houses on my road are brick for the ground floor and then pebble dash. As people have renovated over the years some have had the pebbledash removed and replaced by render and painted.

    Why should this cause damp?
     

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